Canadian Inuit Help out Their Russian Kin Arctic Native People Send Aid to Their Cultural Cousins Hit byRussia's Crisis

By Ruth Walker, writer of The Christian Science Monitor | The Christian Science Monitor, January 8, 1999 | Go to article overview

Canadian Inuit Help out Their Russian Kin Arctic Native People Send Aid to Their Cultural Cousins Hit byRussia's Crisis


Ruth Walker, writer of The Christian Science Monitor, The Christian Science Monitor


Call it "hands across the icecap."

It's an unusual aid initiative from the native peoples of Arctic Canada to those of Arctic Russia. It illustrates how, in the age of e-mail and fax machines, "horizontal" connections among members of a cultural group may be more important than the "vertical" connections within the traditional nation-state.

Fourteen tons of foodstuffs and supplies landed in the Russian Far East Wednesday as the first phase of what is hoped will develop into a multimillion-dollar program to help Inuit (Eskimo) villages of the Chukotka Autonomous Region. The money has come from the Canadian government. But the aid is being organized by the Canadian branch of the Inuit Circumpolar Conference (ICC), a nongovernmental organization representing the 125,000 Inuit of Russia, the United States, and Denmark, as well as Canada. Its agenda focuses on development and environmental issues. The food and supplies were flown into Anadyr, the regional capital. From there, the aid is being transferred to three predominantly Inuit villages: Enurmino, Sireniki, and Yanrakynnot. Officials are quick to point out that the aid is to be distributed on an equal-opportunity basis, to non-Inuit as well, but clearly the personal links between the indigenous peoples in the two countries have been a factor is getting the aid organized. The airlift, in the planning stages since November, has occurred as Canadian Inuit are feeling a shock closer to home: the loss of nine people in an avalanche in the northern Quebec community of Kangiqsualujjuaq. As one official puts it, the tragedy highlights how "marginalized" the Inuit are, with inadequate housing and other problems. But they have demonstrated their generosity before. An international aid officer in Ottawa notes that during the Ethiopian crisis of the mid-1980s, Inuit were among the highest per capita donors in the country. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Canadian Inuit Help out Their Russian Kin Arctic Native People Send Aid to Their Cultural Cousins Hit byRussia's Crisis
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.