Tangled Past Binds Super Bowl Teams Game Links Three Men Trying to Overcome Personal History in Quest Toforge a Football Legacy

By Douglas S. Looney Senior sports columnist of The Christian ScienceMonitor | The Christian Science Monitor, January 28, 1999 | Go to article overview

Tangled Past Binds Super Bowl Teams Game Links Three Men Trying to Overcome Personal History in Quest Toforge a Football Legacy


Douglas S. Looney Senior sports columnist of The Christian ScienceMonitor, The Christian Science Monitor


Time was when the three major personalities in Sunday's Super Bowl in Miami - Atlanta coach Dan Reeves, Denver coach Mike Shanahan, and Bronco quarterback John Elway - were pals.

After all, they were bound by a common and sturdy thread in the 1980s and early 1990s when Reeves was Denver's highly successful head coach, Shanahan the top-gun assistant, and Elway one of the all- time best in the business: Each was very, very good and the Broncos were winning a lot.

All was well. Well, at the end, not exactly. To compress mightily: Reeves coached the Broncos for 12 years (1981 to '92), getting them to the Super Bowl three times. But each time they lost. Shanahan got along wondrously with Elway during his time as an assistant, better than Reeves could honestly claim. Reeves got to suspecting his dashing young assistant and his dashing young quarterback were conspiring on the play calling, leaving the boss out of the loop. The Shanahans and the Elways vacationed together. Reeves fired Shanahan after the 1991 season, bringing up the word "insubordination." Elway said playing for Reeves was "the worst" and they no longer were speaking. Reeves countered that these years weren't "heaven" for him either. Owner Pat Bolen, in what some saw as capitulation to Elway, fired Reeves. You get the point. Things, shall we say, deteriorated. But no need to dwell on this checkered past. For openers, each is a decent man, especially by NFL standards. Each is hard-driving, so energetic that it's not that they are willing to work from dawn to exhaustion but that they want to. Ever since The Clash - as Reeves moved through the Giants and on to the Falcons in 1997, Shanahan traveled through the 49ers and then back to Denver in 1995 as the man in charge, and Elway never moved anywhere - discussions have raged over who was right in those bad old days. Answer: maybe all of them and maybe none of them. Sometimes, good people with good intentions can just be bad for each other. Yet, Sunday's game between the 16-2 teams will be dissected with intensity by many, trying to find clues in the performances that might suggest who was right when bickering in the shadow of the Rockies was at full amp. Gen. Patton in a sweat suit Reeves, a long time NFL veteran and former player, is a prototype coach out of central casting. He believes in discipline, blocking, and tackling. His demeanor often is gruff, but this attitude helps to let everyone know who is in charge. Most important, it lets the players know for sure they are not in charge. Nothing about Reeves is flashy. Everything is oak solid, especially his talent. In 1996, the year before Reeves took over as Falcon coach, they were 3-13. Never in the Falcons previous 32-year history had they even made it to a conference championship game, much less the Super Bowl. The Falcons are next to last in winning percentage (Tampa Bay is last) in the NFL over the last 28 years. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Tangled Past Binds Super Bowl Teams Game Links Three Men Trying to Overcome Personal History in Quest Toforge a Football Legacy
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.