Gauging the Effects of Violent Video Games

By Daniel B. Wood, writer of The Christian Science Monitor | The Christian Science Monitor, May 7, 1999 | Go to article overview

Gauging the Effects of Violent Video Games


Daniel B. Wood, writer of The Christian Science Monitor, The Christian Science Monitor


At the Fun Factory arcade here, five-year-old Yazmine Greenridge and her mother are duking it out against a video game bad guy. Yazmine pushes the button to make her animated muscleman jump and duck, while mother Tershama uses the joystick to maneuver him on the screen.

The two are here together because Mrs. Greenridge wants to know what games her daughter is playing. "I felt the video games that kids are using at home are too violent, so I brought my daughter here," she says.

The influence of violent video games on youths - amid a greater culture of violence from TV entertainment to news programs - has become a cardinal point in the debate spawned by the school shootings in Littleton, Colo. As the fastest-growing segment of the entertainment industry, video games are coming under increasing scrutiny from psychologists and parents who wonder what influence graphic scenes of shooting and stabbing have on young people. At the same time, many experts say parents - who purchase 90 percent of all video games - must become more aware of what they're buying. "There can perhaps be no more important question in American society today than why is violence a mainstay of our children's amusement?" says Gloria DeGaetano, researcher and author of "Screen Smarts: A Family Guide to Media Literacy." "Companies make these games because they sell," she adds. "We need to ask why are they selling, and why are we as a culture buying them to keep our children entertained?" Targeting video games The current rush for to find out what prompted the Littleton shootings has led many people to probe the potential role of violent video games. This week, Sens. Joseph Liebermann (D) of Connecticut and Orrin Hatch (R) of Utah held hearings on the entertainment industry, criticizing ultraviolent video games - among other things. On Monday, President Clinton plans to hold a White House conference on violence in the media and how it affects students. But experts who study teens and the pop culture say the search for solutions should not simply center around holding the media more accountable. After the shootings, people were "trying to assess what are media doing to kids, when we really needed to be asking: What are our kids doing with media?" says Henry Jenkins, director of the Center for Media Studies at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in Cambridge. "We need to start listening to our children and engaging them on how they use these things, rather than rushing to judgment on the media. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Gauging the Effects of Violent Video Games
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

    Already a member? Log in now.