Cloud over Olympics Lifts - a Bit ; International Body Votes This Weekend on Reform, Hoping to End

By Peter Grier, writer of The Christian Science Monitor | The Christian Science Monitor, December 10, 1999 | Go to article overview

Cloud over Olympics Lifts - a Bit ; International Body Votes This Weekend on Reform, Hoping to End


Peter Grier, writer of The Christian Science Monitor, The Christian Science Monitor


Olympic leaders are about to start competing in a new event: the reform decathlon.

The International Olympic Committee meets in Switzerland this weekend to vote on changes to the way it does business. Days later, IOC head Juan Antonio Samaranch flies to Washington to likely tell Congress that the corruption crisis - which began a year ago this month over Salt Lake City's winning bid for the 2002 Games - is over.

The Olympics, once described as the perfect marriage of sport and commerce, will surely remain the world's top athletic competition. But some in the Olympic movement insist that the reform process has just begun - and that real democracy and openness remain a long way off.

"I do not believe they have removed the tarnish from the rings at all," says David D'Alessandro, president of John Hancock Mutual Life Insurance, a sponsor of the Games in the past. "They have prevented them from tarnishing any more. Now they have to spend a few years shining them."

In the scandal that erupted last December, a senior IOC official and others publicly charged that some IOC members had accepted more than $1 million in gifts, trips, and other favors from the Utah group that landed the Winter Games.

Since then, 10 members have been expelled, and most visits to bid cities by Olympic officials have been banned. A reform committee that includes heavyweights such as former Secretary of State Henry Kissinger has drawn up reforms the IOC will consider in Lausanne on Dec. 11 and 12.

Among the changes: an eight-year term for IOC members; the lowering of the age limit for members to 70; inclusion of 15 active athletes on the Olympic Commission; and a permanent ban on bid-city visits.

Though a faction within the IOC opposes change, the reforms have the support of Mr. Samaranch, the IOC's autocratic chief, and are expected to pass.

"The progress is greater than I would have thought six months ago," says Bill Hybl, president of the United States Olympic Committee and a member of IOC 2000, the overall group that is recommending the reforms.

Critics say the IOC culture will change only gradually under proposed reforms. Current members will not be subject to the age- limit retirement rule, and they won't have to put themselves up for reelection until 2008.

Future lies in new members

And where will new candidates for the IOC come from? From the IOC president and a small selection committee, that's where.

How quickly new members join the committee, and how they behave once they get there, will determine the future of the Olympic movement, say critics. …

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