Overpowering Domestic Violence ; Bringing a Spiritual Perspective to Daily Life

The Christian Science Monitor, October 15, 1999 | Go to article overview

Overpowering Domestic Violence ; Bringing a Spiritual Perspective to Daily Life


A jealous spouse, a rebellious child, an impatient parent, can erupt into an out-of-control monster and wreak havoc on a family, even a community. Too many lives are lost and homes disrupted by domestic violence.

Violent anger is not beyond control or prevention. Divine Love can overpower it. The human expression of Love's power is what can prevent a perpetrator from acting out vicious thoughts, protect innocent bystanders, and promote safety in communities.

I discovered something of this power several years ago at the poultry-packing plant where I worked. As plant employees spilled out of the doors at the end of the day, one man was yelling furiously at a woman. He was bodily dragging her down the street. She managed to pull herself toward the entrance to my office. As I came face to face with this man and urged him to let the woman go, he turned on me with such rage that I froze with fear. He yanked her away. Hundreds of us just stood there dazed by the scene.

Although I felt terror from the top of my head to the tip of my toes, I realized that if someone didn't stop him, he might seriously injure or even kill this woman (who was his wife).

Suddenly I felt impelled by a power beyond myself - way beyond the fear I was feeling - to follow them. At first, I could hardly believe I was walking down that street! But I quickly became aware that something quite unlike physical force, something greater than personal initiative or bravery, was propelling me. It was a power and authority that was equally tender and caring. It was shielding and protecting me.

Walking slowly toward them, I spoke gently. As I came near, the man quieted, put his wife down, and let her rest against a parked car. I said I didn't want to interfere but only wanted him to release his wife and talk with her.

And that's exactly what he did. He agreed not to harm her and I walked away. The crowd dispersed and everyone went calmly home. Both the uncontrolled rage he had exhibited a few moments before and the terror I had felt dissipated. (Incidentally, although this couple got divorced, I sometimes saw them in the cafeteria, apparently enjoying each other's company. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Overpowering Domestic Violence ; Bringing a Spiritual Perspective to Daily Life
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

    Already a member? Log in now.