Tug of War between Nation and States

The Christian Science Monitor, January 6, 2000 | Go to article overview

Tug of War between Nation and States


1787 - A proposed constitution of the United States is drafted in Philadelphia. It calls for a national government of limited powers with all remaining powers residing with the states or the people.

1793 - In Chisholm v. Georgia, the US Supreme Court rules that a citizen of South Carolina may sue the state of Georgia without its consent. The decision brings immediate outcry from supporters of state sovereignty. Congress responds with the 11th Amendment to the Constitution. Ratified in 1795, it reads in part: "The judicial power of the United States shall not be construed to extend to any suit ... against one of the United States by Citizens of another State...."

1819 - In McCulloch v. Maryland, Supreme Court Chief Justice John Marshall rules that the federal government has the power to incorporate a national bank. Opponents had argued that nothing in the Constitution explicitly permits creation of such a bank, an area traditionally regulated by the states. The decision opens the way for expansive interpretations of the national government's "enumerated powers" - much to the alarm of states' rights advocates.

1860s - Slavery and the US Civil War test the limits of state versus national power. The Southern states refuse to abide by federal dictates, claiming they infringe upon the sovereignty of their state governments. The Union prevails under force of arms.

1868 - The 14th Amendment is ratified. It is a federal command to the states - particularly the Southern states - that they are barred from passing state laws that infringe the equal protection and due process of any citizen, including freed slaves. It is a step forward for civil rights and the imposition of federal power at the expense of the states.

1913 - The 16th Amendment passes, establishing a national income tax. This sets the stage for the growth of the federal government by providing a guaranteed source of revenue through direct taxation of the people.

1913 - The 17th Amendment passes, establishing a system in which US senators are elected by voters in their home state rather than by the state legislature, as initially required by the Constitution. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Tug of War between Nation and States
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.