Hizbullah's Stance: Ambiguity

By Scott Peterson, writer of The Christian science Monitor | The Christian Science Monitor, January 21, 2000 | Go to article overview

Hizbullah's Stance: Ambiguity


Scott Peterson, writer of The Christian science Monitor, The Christian Science Monitor


The turbaned Sayed Hassan Nasrallah, leader of the Hizbullah, is known in the halls of the US State Department as a "Specially Designated Terrorist." Officials say he is a threat to any Arab- Israeli peace, and cite his alleged links to grabbing American hostages in the 1980s; and bombings, like the one in 1983 of the US Marine barracks in Lebanon that left 241 dead. Mr. Nasrallah consistently denies any role in those events.

But in an exclusive interview inside tightly secured offices in the southern suburbs of Beirut, the Muslim cleric is far more concerned with Hizbullah's place in history and its "victory" here.

"This victory is extremely significant, since from the beginning, Israel gave the impression that it can't be conquered and ... [that Arabs should] not even contemplate fighting," says Nasrallah, who despite his fiery rhetoric in public, is softspoken in person. "And now in south Lebanon, Israel has no choice but to withdraw. The great Israeli Army is weaker than people thought."

Israel has vowed to withdraw its 1,500 troops from Lebanon by July - regardless of any peace agreement with Syria. Though, any official indication from Hizbullah that it would not pursue its fight across the border into Israel might help jumpstart peace talks.

But Hizbullah refuses to say whether it will give up its long- term vow to "liberate" Jerusalem. Nasrallah prefers a policy of ambiguity, thereby reserving the right to derail any accord.

"Keeping this issue unknown - which means there is a possibility for [cross border attacks] to happen, or ... not - is strong for both Lebanon and Syria.

"In the end, this is an extremely important card to play, and the Israelis know that."

Deemed to be more moderate and pragmatic than previous Hizbullah chiefs, Nasrallah is credited with reorganizing the movement when he took control in 1992, after his predecessor, Sheikh Abbas Mussawi and his family were assassinated in an Israeli helicopter gunship attack.

More than a few Israeli analysts say that Hizbullah has turned Israel's 22-year presence in Lebanon into a humiliating defeat not unlike America's in Vietnam.

Hizbullah is as secretive as it is effective on the battlefield. And its core, anti-Israel beliefs haven't changed, Nasrallah says. …

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