Where Ranchers Pine for a National Park ; in Colorado's San Luis Valley, Greater Protection of the Sand Dunes Could Keep Water from Being Taken

By Jillian Lloyd, | The Christian Science Monitor, March 22, 2000 | Go to article overview

Where Ranchers Pine for a National Park ; in Colorado's San Luis Valley, Greater Protection of the Sand Dunes Could Keep Water from Being Taken


Jillian Lloyd,, The Christian Science Monitor


They are as improbable as they are breathtaking. Saharan dunes set in an alpine valley 8,200 feet above sea level, nestled below Colorado's snowy Sangre de Cristo Mountains.

Rising 750 feet above the San Luis Valley floor in twisting spines of light and shadow, the Great Sand Dunes have long been cherished as geologic marvels - the tallest dunes in the Western Hemisphere.

But this week, as the federal government moves closer to declaring the area a national park, it's what lies unseen below the sands - and not stunning vistas - that's driving the push for more protection.

A vast supply of underground water is what keeps the dunes in place, and an unlikely alliance of local farmers and national conservationists want to make sure it isn't sucked dry by thirsty cities and suburbs.

In a time when Western landowners sometimes go to violent extremes to keep the federal government out, the crusade for national-park status here is peculiar. But in the San Luis Valley, where rainfall is as scarce as it is in Death Valley, Calif., water is a binding force and, for many, a means of livelihood.

"Any method that will keep the water in the valley for the farmers has to be pursued. I'm all for it," says Joe Gallegos, a local fifth-generation farmer and rancher. "Water is very sacred. It's a part of us."

The longstanding quest to make the Great Sand Dunes a national park takes a meaningful step forward this week. Rep. Scott McInnis (R) of Colorado is expected to introduce legislation in Congress to create the Great Sand Dunes National Park.

In a display of bipartisanship, Interior Secretary Bruce Babbitt is a staunch advocate of the plan. Also, President Clinton has allocated $8 million to buy private land to quadruple the park's size.

The sandscape covers 39 square miles, and attracts 300,000 visitors annually. It's the underground aquifer, though, that's the critical element of the landscape.

The dunes were formed over a million-year period, as northeasterly winds deposited sand at the base of the 14,000-foot Sangre de Cristos. These winds continue to blow daily, but two southwest-flowing creeks flanking the dunes recycle sand that blows off, and moisture from beneath the dunes helps keep the sand stable.

"It's a relatively closed system of sand cycling," says Steve Chaney, the monument's superintendent. If either the surface water or groundwater were depleted, "something fairly significant would happen to the dunes over time," he says.

Sin agua no hay vida - "without water, there is no life" - is a common refrain here. The San Luis Valley, a semi-arid plateau that's roughly the size of Connecticut, gets less than 8 inches of rain each year.

But thanks to groundwater, the region hums to the sound of sprinklers. It produces rich crops of potatoes, barley, and alfalfa. In the local newspaper, grain and potato prices are printed alongside the Dow Jones Industrials.

For Mr. Gallegos, the worry is that cities will plunk down millions of dollars for water. …

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