To Actors, Advertising Doesn't Pay (Enough) ; A Strike This Week by 135,000 Actors Signals Trouble in Hollywood - and a Shift to Cable

By Daniel B. Wood, writer of The Christian Science Monitor | The Christian Science Monitor, May 5, 2000 | Go to article overview

To Actors, Advertising Doesn't Pay (Enough) ; A Strike This Week by 135,000 Actors Signals Trouble in Hollywood - and a Shift to Cable


Daniel B. Wood, writer of The Christian Science Monitor, The Christian Science Monitor


The placards read, "When you play me, pay me" and "Advertisers: Do you trust them?"

Alongside 50 other picketing actors - on their way to disrupt the shooting of a Nike shoe commercial - Tisza Major explains the beef.

"Acting is my life, my passion and my dream," says the performer, who earned less than $7,500 last year making four commercials. "I now have people asking me to take less than starvation wages to do my job."

In a coast-to-coast strike that began this week, 135,000 union actors hope to claim a bigger share of advertising profits in the booming US economy. Though focused on advertising, the struggle reflects growing labor discontent in Hollywood, which is likely to resurface in bargaining by actors and writers in the next two years.

It also reflects a shifting industry landscape. Increasingly, those who produce Hollywood entertainment believe they are not sharing in its expansion into newer mediums, namely cable television and the Internet.

"This is really a technology dispute," says Gary Chaison, an industrial relations professor at Clark University in Worcester, Mass. "The mediums for which these people perform their tasks have changed so much that they feel they must change the rules by which they play."

Actors want to end the system under which they get one-time fees for commercials that run on cable TV. Instead, they want to get paid for each time an ad airs, which is standard procedure for ads run on broadcast networks. And they want to discuss pay for Internet spots. Advertisers, meanwhile, want to extend the flat-fee system to broadcast ads.

The same issues are expected to come up when actors and writers negotiate contracts with networks and production studios.

The pay struggle comes as Los Angeles is already suffering from an exodus of movie and commercial production. A strike in 1988 - the last large entertainment-industry labor action - cost the industry nearly $500 million and was very destructive to that season's television production.

"These people are really putting themselves and their livelihoods on the line," says Greg Krizman, spokesman for the Screen Actors Guild and the American Federation of Television and Radio Artists. Noting that the strike is costing SAG members about $2 million a day, he expects negotiations to take months. …

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