Campaign Literature Is Smothering Us!

By Ligon, Josephine | The Christian Science Monitor, September 29, 2000 | Go to article overview

Campaign Literature Is Smothering Us!


Ligon, Josephine, The Christian Science Monitor


It doesn't matter whether we're Democrats or Republicans, left fielders or right fielders. We've got to join together and make those candidates stop stuffing us with campaign literature.

I used to think the political mail would ebb, once the people simply told the candidates whom they were for. I did that several times, but the mail just kept on coming. Politicians wanted the grassroots opinion. They wanted to know how I felt about abortion, human rights, the Mideast, the Far East, South America, illegal aliens, the defense budget, safety on the streets, and taxes. I told them everything I knew.

For a while, I got the impression I was running the whole country by myself. Of course, they wanted a little contribution here and a little handout there. But that was all right. I knew they had to eat while I made their decisions.

But I soon came to see that this was far from the truth. In fact, not only weren't they listening to me, but they kept spending my contribution to buy postage to send me more letters and pamphlets and quiz questions and testimonials.

Some epistles did not come in the standard 9-1/2 by 4-1/4-inch envelopes. They came in huge, foot-long red, white, and blue packets marked "Urgent," "Hand Deliver," "Open in 24 hours," or "Reply Immediately."

No one hand-delivered these things to me, even though the campaigns were evidently paying for it. No, the letters were stuffed into my mailbox. My politician was getting ripped off by the post office.

Those politicians have to realize that most of us only have one mailbox. Mine is about 5-1/2 inches wide, 6 inches high, and 15 inches deep.

I simply do not have room for all this political palaver, and it's spilling out all over the highways and byways of this beautiful country, creating a national litter pile. And telephone lines are being jammed by aides who tell you that a famous politician wants to talk to you . …

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