USA

By Robert Kilborn and Judy Nichols | The Christian Science Monitor, July 28, 2000 | Go to article overview

USA


Robert Kilborn and Judy Nichols, The Christian Science Monitor


By midnight tonight, the online song-sharing service of Napster Inc. was to be shut down per a preliminary federal injunction. In San Francisco Wednesday, Judge Marilyn Hall Patel granted the order at the request of the Recording Industry Association of America, which sued Napster in December to resolve a landmark battle over Internet technology and copyright. An estimated 20 million Napster users will be affected by the injunction, which the judge said she issued because Napster hadn't policed the unauthorized trade of copyrighted music through its system. Users were flooding the online service to download as much as possible before the shutdown.

Seven Internet retailers, including Web sites for Macy's department store and Toys "R" Us, will pay a total of $1.5 million to settle charges they didn't treat customers fairly when shipping delays occurred during the past holiday season, the Federal Trade Commission announced. It alleged that the companies failed to give buyers an opportunity to cancel orders, and, in many cases, didn't even send delay notices. Online retail sales soared at the end of last year, but there were numerous reports of logistical difficulties in processing orders.

In what is being billed as a first in the nation, prosecutors in southern California plan to offer free DNA tests to some inmates, USA Today reported. It said that San Diego County prosecutors have been reviewing the cases of about 560 prisoners to determine whether DNA tests developed since their convictions - all prior to 1992 - could be used to establish innocence or guilt. The tests would cost about $5,000 each, the newspaper said, adding that similar initiatives are being considered in Illinois and Texas. …

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