Enrollment Surges at Faith-Based Colleges ; Boom Comes in Reaction to a Perceived Decline in Morality, Culture of Materialism

By Craig Savoye, | The Christian Science Monitor, September 14, 2000 | Go to article overview

Enrollment Surges at Faith-Based Colleges ; Boom Comes in Reaction to a Perceived Decline in Morality, Culture of Materialism


Craig Savoye,, The Christian Science Monitor


While a senior last spring at a high school in Platte City, Mo., Elaine Brown had her eye on Southwest Missouri State University, the college her older brother attends.

But a friend was visiting Missouri Baptist College in St. Louis, and Elaine hadn't used up all of her allotted college-visit days. So, on a whim, she decided to make the trip. Result: a new applicant.

"I wasn't raised in a Christian home," she says. "My parents really wanted me to go to a [secular] university, but I didn't want that."

Now a freshmen at Missouri Baptist, Elaine is one of thousands of students propelling an enrollment boom at faith-based colleges and universities across the country.

In an age when many young people are seeking more moral rigor in their lives, a growing number are choosing to attend religious- affiliated schools, where class sizes are often small and the emphasis on values overt.

Between 1990 and 1998, the student population at the 100 member schools of the Council for Christian Colleges and Universities (CCCU) jumped 35 percent. It rose 12 percent over the same period for all institutions with religious affiliations. That compares with a 5 percent increase at private colleges and 4 percent at public universities.

"The numbers show that, while parts of society may be drifting deeper into materialism and a me-first attitude about life, there are still ... millions of parents and students saying there must be something more and better to life, and they want that something to be part of their college education," says Robert Andringa, president of the CCCU.

A boom in the number of home-schooled students from 1 million in 1992 to 1.5 million today, plus a surge in enrollment at Christian private high schools, has contributed to the recruitment pool for Christian colleges.

But broader cultural factors are at work as well. Some, in fact, see a direct connection between a decline of morality in America and fuller classrooms at faith-based colleges. "There are a lot of people reacting to the direction our culture is taking," says Alton Lacey, president of Missouri Baptist College. "Those are the people we see coming to our institution."

The school prohibits alcohol, tobacco, and dancing on campus. Its enrollment has tripled in the past 10 years, to 3,000.

A buoyant economy may be contributing to the enrollment surge, too. Joel Carpenter, provost of Calvin College in Grand Rapids, Mich., cites surveys showing the upward mobility of evangelical Christians, leaving many better able to afford college.

At the same time, academic standards have risen at faith-based schools. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Enrollment Surges at Faith-Based Colleges ; Boom Comes in Reaction to a Perceived Decline in Morality, Culture of Materialism
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.