Supply and Demand:in Balance ; Bringing a Spiritual Perspective to Daily Life

The Christian Science Monitor, November 7, 2000 | Go to article overview

Supply and Demand:in Balance ; Bringing a Spiritual Perspective to Daily Life


Along with a lot of other people, I know what it's like to spend the entire day worrying if you'll have everything you need. You wonder if you can pay the rent or mortgage, buy the food, save for the future. If you'll be secure.

At the root of this preoccupation, of course, is fear, and sometimes especially the fear of being alone, with the weight of responsibility to meet all those demands.

Even when lack and insufficiency seem to be all around us, there's a way to feel safe. But I've found that it begins not with what I save, but with what I think. I've got to think beyond the surface of "supply and demand out of balance" to a deeper spiritual reality.

Here's how I reason with myself sometimes: The force that created us is totally good. And this force, which some people call God, is an omnipotent Mind that intelligently supplies every legitimate demand.

In God's universe, supply and demand are like an inseparable matched pair. The demand isn't for money or things, actually, but for ideas. Divine Mind is the source of all ideas and supplies the ideas that are needed for every demand.

For instance, when I'm short of funds, I first of all need a peaceful frame of mind, which is what breaks down fear. And I've found this need met by getting ideas from God about His love for me and for everyone. Thoughts about how God cares for us and keeps us safe.

Keeping focused on the spiritual cause of life has really helped me see that God's creation can't lack anything. As God's loved sons and daughters, we have a right to feel secure and to see our needs met. In fact, the divine Mind expresses its own abundant intelligence through each one of us. And there can be no withholding of good, because God is good and imparts goodness continually.

Thinking of how Jesus fed thousands of people with five loaves of bread and two fish, I love how he gave thanks to God before any additional food appeared (see Matt. …

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