Put Women at the Peace Table

By H. E. Sheikh Hasina | The Christian Science Monitor, November 13, 2000 | Go to article overview

Put Women at the Peace Table


H. E. Sheikh Hasina, The Christian Science Monitor


The United Nations Security Council made history last month by calling for the inclusion of more women in peacemaking negotiations and peacekeeping forces worldwide, and within the UN peace- building system.

It's about time, given the violent setbacks in the Middle East peace process and the clear lack of progress in the dialogue for peace in other conflict areas.

Bangladesh was instrumental in pioneering the first statement by the Security Council on women's efforts for peace during its presidency of the council this year. The Oct. 31 resolution endorses the idea of finally bringing the missing half of the world's population to the tables where peace is sought. It calls on Secretary-General Kofi Annan to use women as chief envoys in pursuing peace talks and heading peace missions.

Women from war-torn countries told members of the Security Council: Bring more women into the talks, into global peacekeeping and reconstruction, and into your own operations, and you will see those results for which the world yearns.

The argument is compelling.

In Northern Ireland, women's groups spent a decade building the trust between Protestants and Roman Catholics that was the foundation for the ultimate agreements. In Latin America, mothers, wives, and sisters dared to question the military juntas about "disappeared" relatives.

In Bosnia, women cross ethnic lines to rebuild working coalitions in Parliament.

In Sudan and in the Middle East, women from both sides of the conflict have long warned of excluding any sector from the peace process, and they have proposed new avenues that merit exploration, if only negotiators will listen.

Yet, despite their effectiveness on the ground, women are largely absent from high-level peace negotiations.

Only two of the 126 delegates to the Arusha peace talks in Burundi are women, although women are seeking peace within their communities there. …

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