State Colleges Start Border Wars over Tuition ; to Lure Top Prospects, Public Universities Slash Their Prices for Out-Of- State Students

By Savoye, Craig | The Christian Science Monitor, December 27, 2000 | Go to article overview

State Colleges Start Border Wars over Tuition ; to Lure Top Prospects, Public Universities Slash Their Prices for Out-Of- State Students


Savoye, Craig, The Christian Science Monitor


Schuyler Stephens is a college recruiter's dream.

He's president of his senior class at Christopher High School in Illinois. He's a four-year letterman in football, basketball, and baseball, as well as a member of the drama and science clubs. He ranks No. 8 in his class. And he hasn't missed a day of school since second grade.

It's no surprise, then, that Murray State University is desperate to attract Schuyler and students like him. What is perhaps surprising, though, is how far this public university in Kentucky is willing to go to get a kid from another state.

This summer, Murray State is starting what amounts to a tuition border war to lure students from neighboring states. For co-eds from Illinois, Tennessee, and Missouri, it will match the price of the in-state competition.

As states clamor to secure the best students, more states from Florida to South Dakota are offering out-of-state students substantial tuition breaks.

Some critics deride the trend as a misuse of state subsidies. But others see these students as tomorrow's workers, and with today's economy founded on education and high-tech know-how, many state and education officials are increasingly seeing these brightest students as crucial to future prosperity.

"If there is anywhere this sort of trend is going to continue to develop, it's going to be in the Midwest," says Travis Reindl of the American Association of State Colleges and Universities. "It's about demographics. A number of Plains States are, in the immediate term, going to be looking at some slowing and slumping enrollment.

"For particular institutions, there is going to be a real challenge to maintain and grow an enrollment base over the next five to 10 years," he says.

A case in point is South Dakota. It has already reached an agreement with Minnesota that allows students from either state to attend the other's public colleges at roughly the same cost as in- state students. But to the south and north, Nebraska and North Dakota are drawing away students with scholarship programs and reduced tuition rates.

So far the South Dakota Legislature has declined to offer a similar tuition discount.

An out-of-state subsidy?

Indeed, most state legislators find such programs to be problematic. They don't want to back tuition-reduction programs that could be construed by voters as giving away state subsidies. But without the ability to offer such programs, state colleges aren't meeting their recruiting goals.

The quandary was evident in a dust-up that occurred along the Texas-Louisiana border two years ago. The Texas Legislature agreed to a tuition-reduction plan for all public colleges and universities within 100 miles of the Lone Star state's border. …

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State Colleges Start Border Wars over Tuition ; to Lure Top Prospects, Public Universities Slash Their Prices for Out-Of- State Students
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