Muslim Americans Work to Make Their Vote Heard ; Wooed in Several Swing States Their Profile Rises

By Jane Lampman writer of The Christian Science Monitor | The Christian Science Monitor, November 2, 2000 | Go to article overview

Muslim Americans Work to Make Their Vote Heard ; Wooed in Several Swing States Their Profile Rises


Jane Lampman writer of The Christian Science Monitor, The Christian Science Monitor


At a time when many Americans are blase or cynical about the political system, many Muslims are energized by a desire to find their place in US society and to press domestic and foreign policy concerns.

Among this burgeoning Muslim-American movement to get active in politics are people like Mustafa Tameez, an advertising rep in Houston, who is an enthusiastic participant in the political process. Working his way up in the Texas Democratic Party, he's now on the state nomination committee. His wife, Selma, joined 50 other Muslims as delegates to this year's Democratic National Convention.

"I grew up in this country. My parents migrated here, and I was always told this was the land of opportunity," Mr. Tameez says.

Tahir Ali, a software engineer who chairs the Massachusetts chapter of the American Muslim Alliance (AMA), is active in state Republican circles and was an adviser on a 1996 Republican presidential campaign task force.

Karreim Muhammad, an African-American Muslim from Detroit, ran this year for the Michigan state house. He lost in the primary, but the experience has encouraged him to try again in two years.

Muslim Americans are grabbing the attention of both parties in the presidential campaign because of where they reside. Concentrated in "battleground states" such as Ohio, Michigan, Pennsylvania, Illinois, California, and Texas, Muslims could make a difference in the outcome, pollster John Zogby says.

With the two candidates running neck and neck in Michigan, for example, both George W. Bush and Al Gore have courted local groups of the estimated 275,000-strong Arab-American community (one-half Christian) and the 450,000 Muslims in the state.

Two organizations from these Michigan communities recently endorsed Governor Bush. "A lot of it is access," says Kay Siblani, of the Michigan chapter of Council of American-Islamic Relations. "I think people here feel the Republican party in general and Bush in particular will prove to be more flexible on foreign policy in the Middle East."

Encouraged by their potential to be a swing vote, a coalition of national Muslim organizations is urging their communities to consider voting in a bloc. On Oct. 23, the political action committee of the American Muslim Political Coordination Committee (AMPCC-PAC) also endorsed Bush, citing his outreach to the Muslim community, his stand on an important domestic issue, and their expectation of greater flexibility on foreign policy issues.

"Many Muslims were very happy that Bush spoke during the second debate against profiling of Arab-Americans and about the issue of secret evidence [in hearings of the INS]," says Syed Ahsani, AMA chairman in Texas.

The Council of American-Islamic Relations (CAIR) recently released results of a poll which showed a major shift in Muslim preferences since June. …

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