Bush Will Have to Build from a Precarious Foundation

By Peter Grier writer of The Christian Science Monitor | The Christian Science Monitor, December 14, 2000 | Go to article overview

Bush Will Have to Build from a Precarious Foundation


Peter Grier writer of The Christian Science Monitor, The Christian Science Monitor


As he recovers from the strain and stress of the longest election in American history, George W. Bush might do well to ponder this possibility: The hardest part of his journey has yet to begin.

He will become president, true. He will be the first Republican chief executive since Dwight Eisenhower to deal with a Congress controlled by his own party.

But some supporters of the defeated Al Gore may believe the new President Bush to be president with an asterisk, someone who won the office on a technicality. And he will take office with the nation's politics as polarized as an electric current - and in the knowledge that Florida's disputed ballots will be counted, recounted, and disputed by journalists and scholars for decades to come.

This does not necessarily mean his will be a weak administration. Presidents have vast powers at their disposal - not least the power of bully-pulpit persuasion. But the job will test every ounce of Mr. Bush's self-proclaimed uniting skills. When it comes to partisanship, Washington is to Austin as the Atlantic Ocean is to Walden Pond.

"The only way for the next president to be effective is to demonstrate that his loyalty to his party comes after his loyalty to the entire country," says University of Oklahoma President David Boren, a former Democratic senator. "For too long the two parties have been fighting each other in a very petty way."

The end of the process does not appear to have made Bush's impending task any easier. The narrow US Supreme Court decision ending any prospect of official Florida hand recounts did finally - finally! - give Bush a victory that he had held in his hands, only to have it snatched away, several times before.

But the ruling was far from definitive. Several of its dissents were extraordinarily bitter in tone. To see the highest court in the land as split as a Florida canvassing board - and evidently struggling to find a solution to an almost insoluble problem - could well embolden Democratic critics for years to come.

After Watergate ended with President Nixon's resignation, many Americans had a feeling that the political system had, to a certain extent, worked. After the Long Election, many may feel that the system simply survived. Even on the part of many of Bush's supporters there is a feeling less of triumph than relief.

"By ruling in a way that will long be seen as partisan," the Supreme Court did not help Bush's chances of being seen as a legitimate winner, says William Leuchtenburg, a historian at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

Voters are likely to rally around the president-elect in the days to come. That is a common post-election phenomenon in America. His poll numbers will rise, the choosing of his Cabinet will seem a comfortable and familiar ritual. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • A full archive of books and articles related to this one
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Bush Will Have to Build from a Precarious Foundation
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

    Already a member? Log in now.