Internet Gave an Edge to 2000 Election

By Regan, Tom | The Christian Science Monitor, December 21, 2000 | Go to article overview

Internet Gave an Edge to 2000 Election


Regan, Tom, The Christian Science Monitor


If you want to know how important the Internet became during the 2000 election, consider this fact: The entire Florida voting drama never would have occurred if an Al Gore staffer had not been monitoring the Web site of the Secretary of Florida on election night.

Mr. Gore had already called George Bush to concede, and was on his way to address the nation when the aide noticed on the Web site that the vice-president had pulled within 600 votes of the Texas governor. He called the Gore motorcade and Gore then made the now famous second call. There will be debate by historians until, well, there are no more historians.

While some people may wish the staffer had not been quite so zealous, so we all could have avoided pregnant chads and the like, the Internet can no longer be discounted as "something to let the kids do" in election campaigns.

Let's look at the most crucial part of political campaigning these days - raising money. Of the $3 billion raised by candidates this election, only about $50 million came via the Internet. Yet that $50 million played a key role in two important campaigns.

Sen. John McCain used money raised on the Internet, mostly via credit-card donations, to keep his primary campaign alive, because he had immediate access to the funds donated. Presidential runner Ralph Nader raised about $1 million on the Internet, showing third- party candidates everywhere the potential to reach out and raise money among groups that most traditional fundraising activities overlook.

Watch for all candidates to use the Internet in 2002 and beyond to complement money raised via other methods.

The Florida election debacle also gave a boost to another Internet idea - voting online (see story Nov. …

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