Hunter-Gault Recalls First Steps onto White Campus

By Mark Clayton writer of The Christian Science Monitor | The Christian Science Monitor, January 9, 2001 | Go to article overview

Hunter-Gault Recalls First Steps onto White Campus


Mark Clayton writer of The Christian Science Monitor, The Christian Science Monitor


For CNN reporter Charlayne Hunter-Gault, the foam and fury of the political transition in South Africa contains echoes of her years at the University of Georgia (UGA), which today celebrates the 40th anniversary of its desegregation. Ms. Hunter-Gault was one of the first black students to attend the school.

She looked back at the time in a recent telephone interview:

What are your memories of that first night in the University of Georgia dorm?

In a real sense, those events helped to motivate my life. I remember walking under that archway [onto the campus], that it was a brisk January day, the coat I was wearing, the kind of blouse, socks, and boots. We were children of the black middle class, taught to present ourselves to the world as well turned out as we could.

The media will call me a pioneer, but I had a life before I went to the University of Georgia. And my values were already formed. But this was the test of all that armor that our family and our community had been piling on us through our values passed on to us through school and church.

What's most significant about that time?

UGA was the bastion of the old order. Everyone who protected and defended and perpetuated the old order went there. So for it to fall, led to every other bastion falling in its wake.

By the fall of 1961, high schools and elementary schools were being desegregated. It just opened up the whole state. I'm not sure I realized it was going to be that big. If I had thought about it, it might have been daunting. We did instinctively what we had to do to get through the rough patch, just get through the day. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Hunter-Gault Recalls First Steps onto White Campus
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.