Prisoners' Strike Tests Turkey's Human Rights Image ; One More Prisoner on Hunger Strike Died Yesterday, Bringing the Total to 15

By Morris, Chris | The Christian Science Monitor, April 23, 2001 | Go to article overview

Prisoners' Strike Tests Turkey's Human Rights Image ; One More Prisoner on Hunger Strike Died Yesterday, Bringing the Total to 15


Morris, Chris, The Christian Science Monitor


Just before she died earlier this month, Gulsuman Donmez wrote a letter to her 11-year-old, son Sinan.

"I love you more than life ... and I don't know how to tell you how happy I am," she wrote.

She is one of 15 people who have died in a bitter protest over conditions in Turkish prisons. Thirteen inmates and two of their relatives have starved themselves to death since late last month, and dozens of others are in critical condition.

The hunger strike began last October as a protest against controversial prison reforms. The worst, prisoners say, is the policy of moving inmates from large dormitory wards into small cells, where, they say, they are isolated and beaten by brutal wardens.

In December, security forces raided prisons across the country to enforce the transfer of more than 1,000 people. Thirty prisoners and two soldiers died in four days of clashes, but the hunger strike did not come to an end.

Led by members of hard-line left-wing groups, the strike has generated little public sympathy. But it has become another test of Turkey's battered human rights image. With some 800 inmates taking part in the protest, criticism of the government is beginning to grow.

Even President Ahmet Necdet Sezer has urged the government to take more urgent steps to protect prisoners' lives. But the justice minister, Hikmet Sami Turk, has said there is "no question of negotiating with terrorists."

Most of the hunger strikers are members of the outlawed Revolutionary People's Liberation Army-Front or similar Marxist groups that have claimed responsibility for scores of attacks and assassinations over the past decade.

The government has promised to implement legal reforms in order to ease the regime of isolation, which is the main focus of the protest. The proposals have been condemned as insufficient, however, by lawyers and human rights groups.

"This draft bill does not really eliminate isolation. It is not possible for the prisoners to accept this," says Oral Calislar, a leading Turkish columnist who has been trying to mediate an end to the hunger strike.

There is little doubt that the Turkish prison system - the wards - had to change. Under the old regime, inmates ran their own wards and indoctrinated new recruits. Revolutionary slogans were painted on the walls, and there were military-style roll calls every morning. But the new prisons, known as "F-types," have been condemned by international human rights groups. …

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