Asian-Americans Fret about Effects of Chill with China ; More Than Other Minority Groups, They See Their Standing Tied to US Ties with Their Countries of Ancestry

By Paul Van Slambrouck writer of The Christian Science Monitor | The Christian Science Monitor, April 30, 2001 | Go to article overview

Asian-Americans Fret about Effects of Chill with China ; More Than Other Minority Groups, They See Their Standing Tied to US Ties with Their Countries of Ancestry


Paul Van Slambrouck writer of The Christian Science Monitor, The Christian Science Monitor


Regarded over the years as America's "model" minority, Asian- Americans are finding themselves surprisingly vulnerable to racist attitudes that are not quite like anything experienced by other minority groups.

For instance, while African-Americans have had to combat notions of inferiority, Asian-Americans have found that high achievement carries its own backlash.

And while immigrants from Latin America and elsewhere face a stigma of being foreigners, Asian-Americans often confront deeper questioning about their very loyalty and allegiance to the US.

Awareness of these issues, say a number of analysts, is stirring anew among Asian-Americans as they brace for what looks like a chilly chapter in relations between the United States and China.

The heightened diplomatic tension, resulting from this month's downing of an American surveillance plane in China, comes on the heels of other recent sources of discomfort for Asian-Americans.

The treatment of Wen Ho Lee, accused by the US government of stealing nuclear weapons secrets last year, was widely seen by Asian-Americans as having a racial component. And the political fund-raising scandals of a few years ago resulted in treatment of Asian-Americans that soured their relations with both political parties.

Each of these incidents has reinforced what Asian-Americans see as the paradox that, despite their economic and educational achievements in the US, they remain the target of stereotypes and suspicion.

What's more, their status in American society is strongly hinged to external relations between the US and Asia, a feature that sets them apart from the nation's other large minorities and is intensely frustrating for Asian-Americans because it is so beyond their control.

"The way Asian-Americans are treated in this country has been very much dependent over the years on relations between the United States and their country of ancestry," says Ted Wang, policy director of Chinese for Affirmative Action, based in San Francisco.

Military threat during World War II clearly affected the treatment of Asians and led to the internment of many Japanese Americans. But Mr. Wang notes that even during peace time, Asian- Americans have suffered from developments beyond US shores. During the 1980s, for instance, Japanese Americans and other Asians drew ire as a result of the stiff economic competition their region posed to the US. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Asian-Americans Fret about Effects of Chill with China ; More Than Other Minority Groups, They See Their Standing Tied to US Ties with Their Countries of Ancestry
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.