Peru Plays ; Vladimiro Montesinos, Wanted on Corruption and Other Charges, Has Remained at Large for Six Months

By Gunson, Phil | The Christian Science Monitor, May 16, 2001 | Go to article overview

Peru Plays ; Vladimiro Montesinos, Wanted on Corruption and Other Charges, Has Remained at Large for Six Months


Gunson, Phil, The Christian Science Monitor


First there were the videos. Now there's even a computer game focusing on the scandal surrounding Latin America's most-wanted fugitive - Peru's former spy chief, Vladimiro Montesinos.

Accused of multimillion dollar corruption and human rights violations, Mr. Montesinos is believed to have spent most of his six months on the lam here in Venezuela, where he has military contacts.

In Peru, where "Vladigame" went on the market last week, Montesinos represents a decade of decay. As Peruvians prepare to vote in an expected June presidential runoff, the new computer amusement lets them blast the preceding corrupt administration and send Montesinos, formerly head of SIN, the aptly named Peruvian secret police organization, to prison.

"Even though there is a legal process under way to achieve justice, people want to ease their frustrations," says Sebastian Zileri, spokesman for Caretas, the Lima news magazine that produced the game.

The most well-documented sighting of Montesinos was in December, in the Venezuelan capital, Caracas. The opposition press has alleged that the government of President Hugo Chavez knows more than it is letting on about the fugitive's whereabouts.

"I have little doubt," says Teodoro Petkoff, editor of the Caracas evening newspaper TalCual and a minister in a previous administration, "that the government has deliberately muddied the waters over the Montesinos case."

Venezuelan government spokesmen reject such insinuations. "Chavez does not even know Montesinos, and has the greatest interest in seeing him punished," says Interior Minister Luis Miquilena. "He has said that if he [Montesinos] falls into the hands of the Venezuelan government, he will be returned to Peru."

However, links between ex-Peruvian President Alberto Fujimori, close adviser Montesinos, and the current Venezuelan administration go back at least to 1992. That February, Chavez, then a lieutenant colonel, led an attempt to overthrow the Venezuelan government, headed by Carlos Andres Perez.

Mr. Fujimori had good reason to dislike Mr. Perez, who had broken off diplomatic relations with Peru. So when 93 Venezuelan military rebels fled to Peru in a C-130 after a second, November coup attempt had failed, it was not surprising that they were treated warmly after landing in Iquitos. (Chavez was not among them, however, as he was already in jail by the time of the second coup.)

The 93 conspirators were given asylum and lived for two years in comfortable exile at the expense of the Peruvian government. …

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