Bush Air-Safety Plan: Will It Restore Faith? ; President's Steps Include Stronger Cockpit Doors, Federal Oversight of Airport Security

By Amanda Paulson writer of the Christian Science Monitor | The Christian Science Monitor, September 28, 2001 | Go to article overview

Bush Air-Safety Plan: Will It Restore Faith? ; President's Steps Include Stronger Cockpit Doors, Federal Oversight of Airport Security


Amanda Paulson writer of the Christian Science Monitor, The Christian Science Monitor


President Bush's proposals to safeguard the skies - and help US airlines fill more than a paltry 40 percent of their seats - are an extraordinary high-level gambit to restore public confidence in air travel.

Mr. Bush's $3 billion plan to improve security, which he outlined yesterday in Chicago, includes stronger cockpit doors and putting many more federal air marshals aboard flights. He is also expanding the federal role in airport security - a duty long left to individual airlines. Still, the measures stop short of more- controversial ideas, such as arming pilots with lethal or nonlethal weapons.

That the president himself flew to O'Hare International Airport to unveil his plan underscores just how important the aviation industry is to the nation. Since the Sept. 11 hijackings that shredded America's blanket of security, air travel has plummeted, carriers have laid off more than 100,000 workers, and the industry's woes have cascaded into other sectors of the economy.

Early assessments of Bush's plan are that every little bit helps. Whether his proposed safety measures will reassure the flying public - and save the air industry from financial ruin - should become apparent in coming weeks.

"Perception is 90 percent of it," says Richard Gritta, an aviation expert at the University of Portland in Oregon. "If people perceive they're safe, that's the important thing [to get them to resume flying]."

To that end, most federal officeholders are remiss, says Clint Oster, an aviation expert at Indiana University in Bloomington. The fact that Reagan National Airport in Washington remains closed - and that few federal officeholders are flying these days - is hardly confidence-inspiring, he says. "We really haven't seen much in the way of demonstration of faith in the air system by [federal officials] flying on it."

Bush's proposals follow a host of security changes already ordered by the Federal Aviation Administration. Curbside checking of luggage is no longer allowed, nonticketed passengers can't proceed past security points, and everything from safety razors to nail clippers are banned.

Those measures, though, have so far not brought many people back to the skies.

Some of Bush's proposals can be implemented quickly by the FAA. Others will have to go a slower route through Congress.

The president has clearly fastened on those measures that enjoy a wide base of support among lawmakers and security experts: Make cockpit doors more secure, improve luggage-scanning equipment, put more federal air marshals on commercial planes. …

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