The Science of Awe ; despite the Correspondences, Physics and Metaphysics Haven't Merged

By Nartonis, David | The Christian Science Monitor, July 26, 2001 | Go to article overview

The Science of Awe ; despite the Correspondences, Physics and Metaphysics Haven't Merged


Nartonis, David, The Christian Science Monitor


Religious mystics report an invisible reality, beyond the world we observe with the five senses. Now, so do modern physicists.

Traditionally, the deeper reality of the natural scientist has been a clockwork universe of dead matter in motion - hardly consistent with what religious mystics have described. But a few physicists now claim that 20th-century discoveries in their field require a new scientific view of reality, more like what religious seers report.

The latest book to claim this connection between 20th-century physics and religious mysticism is "Nature Loves to Hide," by physicist Shimon Malin. I must admit I haven't found previous attempts along this line to be very convincing. But Malin avoids the major errors that have marred other books of this kind and offers the reader a fascinating introduction to the strange world of quantum physics and its wider implications.

One error that Malin avoids is the claim that philosophical and theological conclusions can be deduced from the science itself. Modern physics consists of mathematical equations and prediction- making procedures that are neither theological nor philosophical. Thus, we can draw such conclusions only if someone adds an interpretation to the bare physics and then connects this interpretation with some larger system of thought.

Although Malin argues passionately and persuasively that the bare physics is suggestive of his own mystical vision, he does not make the mistake of implying that his system can be deduced from the theory. "Although quantum mechanics is not a comprehensive world view," he writes, "it is replete with suggestions."

Malin also won my confidence by acknowledging that not all physicists draw the same conclusions from quantum theory, and he summarizes alternatives to his own view.

Unfortunately, some of Malin's predecessors have ignored this lack of agreement and the technical nature of physics itself in order to claim that quantum physics proves matter to be a purely mental phenomenon. To be accurate, they should say that one of several competing interpretations places the transition from the quantum to the everyday realm inside human consciousness. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • A full archive of books and articles related to this one
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

The Science of Awe ; despite the Correspondences, Physics and Metaphysics Haven't Merged
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

    Already a member? Log in now.