A Friend by Any Other Name

By Shannon, Terry Miller | The Christian Science Monitor, September 18, 2001 | Go to article overview

A Friend by Any Other Name


Shannon, Terry Miller, The Christian Science Monitor


This is my bad news/ good news friendship story. The bad news was that I somehow misplaced my dear friend Gail. The good news is: I found Isabelle.

Gail and I became buddies because of my/her shirt. We met the September after the winter I inadvertently donated all my summer clothes - every sleeveless shirt, pair of shorts, and bathing suit I owned - to the Salvation Army (a swift but painful lesson in the value of labeling boxes).

The first day of college, I noticed a girl with a red bandanna triangled over her blond hair. What really caught my eye, though, was her shirt - or should I say "my" shirt?

She was wearing my favorite of the oops-to-the-Salvation-Army summer shirts. It was undoubtedly mine, for it sported a telltale sign: a small, nearly unnoticeable faint pink South America-shape stain near the hem. I knew that stain well.

As it happened, the stranger in the familiar shirt and I ended up in the same career program, taking classes together. In one early group conversation, she mentioned that she hated her name, Gail, and was shopping around for another. (She was seriously considering "Diana.") She described her dog, Bear. She mentioned that she'd worked at the San Francisco Salvation Army before moving north to attend college.

Aha! I blurted, "Did you buy that cream-colored, sleeveless, knit shirt there? The one with the embroidery and the pale pink stain? Size 'small'?"

Gail stared at me, mouth open. "Why, yes, I did - as a matter of fact."

"I can't believe it ended up in San Francisco," I said after I told her my story. "That shirt is more well-traveled than I am!"

The two of us were rather taken with the whole weird shirt coincidence. We found other quirks in common: We both loved to cook. We adored whimsical old houses. We loved big placid dogs. We both had more houseplants than furniture.

Gail was the type of friend who, when she had a dime and I didn't (during our dirt-poor college days), shared her red-licorice rope with me, even-Steven. We wore the same size, of course, so we had frequent clothes-swapping parties. I always felt prettier in clothes Gail had swapped to me. She taught me to cook a cheap comfort-food dish I still make: "Naked Spaghetti" - noodles slathered with butter, Parmesan cheese, and garlic. Best of all, I could tell her anything. She was the best listener I'd ever met.

At our last clothes swap before graduation, she gave me the shirt that had been mine and then hers - and had brought us together. I kept our shirt for years, long past the time I quit wearing it. I'd occasionally take it out of the closet to remember my friend Gail. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

A Friend by Any Other Name
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

    Already a member? Log in now.