Suddenly, World Wants US to Lead ; A Boosted Image Is Raising Hope for a Strong US Role in Reviving Global Economy and Promoting Mideast Peace

By Howard LaFranchi writer of The Christian Science Monitor | The Christian Science Monitor, October 18, 2001 | Go to article overview

Suddenly, World Wants US to Lead ; A Boosted Image Is Raising Hope for a Strong US Role in Reviving Global Economy and Promoting Mideast Peace


Howard LaFranchi writer of The Christian Science Monitor, The Christian Science Monitor


As President Bush arrives in China today for his first foreign trip since the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks, the US is experiencing a surprising surge in expectations around the world for its role as global leader.

Much has been said about the enmity toward the US that lies behind recent attacks on America. Anti-US protests in Pakistan continue to worry leaders in Islamabad and Washington, and other nations have seen pro-peace rallies with anti-US flavoring.

But, at the same time, many people around the world are feeling a mix of sympathy for what America has endured, identification with the US plight, and a positive impression so far of the military response.

Those elements are combining to boost America's image and raise hope for its leadership in everything from reviving the global economy to promoting Mideast peace and fashioning a better future for Afghanistan.

Mr. Bush seems to have grasped the importance of America's opportunity for leadership, after beginning his presidency on a footing that was widely viewed as unilateralist and dismissive of the world.

A changed America is not going unnoticed: The mix of empathy and hope for US success in the war against terrorism is prompting people in different countries and cultures to view American leadership in a new light.

Omar Belhouchet, editor of Algeria's prominent independent newspaper El Watan, sees some silver lining in the "horrifying" events of Sept. 11. Maybe now, he says, America will understand the growing terror other countries have faced and will employ its power to help vanquish the scourge of terrorism everywhere.

Pascal Reber, manufacturing director for a pharmaceutical company outside Paris, says he is "relieved" to see the US taking a more measured and multilateral approach in its war on terrorism than he would have imagined from Bush. He now sees an opportunity for American leadership on a range of global issues, from strengthening democracy to shoring up the global economy.

And Marta Lagos in Santiago, a pollster of Latin American opinion, says her recent surveys suggest a window of opportunity for the US to assert its global leadership as it pursues the war on terrorism. "People are frightened and are looking to the industrialized countries, particularly the US, to do something about it." But their first worry remains the economy, she says, and many doubt that leaders can quickly do anything about it.

Following his own advice to Americans to get back to normal life, the president is holding to his scheduled attendance at the summit of the Asian-Pacific Economic Cooperation forum in Shanghai, China, this weekend. (But he did drop three bilateral visits.) The trip offers a venue to demonstrate that an afflicted global economy has not been forgotten.

From sadness, opportunity

On several recent occasions, Bush has emphasized that the war on terrorism provides the opportunities for America to take positive action in the world.

Out of sadness, said Bush in one speech, America can "forge ... an opportunity to bring peace to the world, the likes of which we've never seen. …

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