Once a Mugabe Supporter, Now His Opponent

By Itano, Nicole | The Christian Science Monitor, March 8, 2002 | Go to article overview

Once a Mugabe Supporter, Now His Opponent


Itano, Nicole, The Christian Science Monitor


Here in Zimbabwe's capital city, the streets are plastered with posters bearing the smiling, round face of opposition leader Morgan Tsvangirai. Graffiti bearing the initials of his party, the Movement for Democratic Change (MDC), is everywhere.

These alone are signs of changing times in Zimbabwe. For the first time in the country's short history, voters going to the polls this weekend have a real alternative to the 22-year rule of President Robert Mugabe and his ZANU-PF Party.

In three short years, Mr. Tsvangirai has built this alternative. And despite widespread political violence aimed at MDC supporters, several polls have shown Tsvangirai with a substantial lead over the incumbent.

Mugabe dismisses the MDC as a "stooge party" and says Tsvangirai is a front for white colonial interests. Newspaper advertisements for the ZANU-PF have even called the opposition candidate British Prime Minister Tony Blair's "tea boy."

But Tsvangirai began as a ZANU-PF Party man, and has record of political activism that stretches back more than two decades.

The eldest son of a bricklayer, Tsvangirai's political schooling took place in the back rooms of labor politics and in the depths of a Zimbabwean mine. During his 10 years at the Trojan Nickel Mine in Bindura, 50 miles north of Harare, Tsvangirai rose to branch chairman of the national mine workers union, and by 1988 he was general secretary of the Zimbabwe Congress of Trade Unions (ZCTU) in charge of the country's labor unions.

Under his leadership, the ZCTU moved into a more antagonistic position with government.

In the early 1990s, Tsvangirai challenged Mugabe's economic restructuring program, which the union believed would harm urban workers. He helped the ZCTU wage a successful battle against several proposed tax increases, including one that would have funded an increase in the pensions of war veterans. Those same war veterans later led bands of landless squatters who occupied much of the country's white-owned farmland.

"[Tsvangirai] led the ZCTU to its rightful place as a labor movement and a part of civil society," says Wellington Chibebe, the current secretary general of the ZCTU and a longtime member of the organization's governing board.

Tsvangirai's wife of 24 years, Susan, says this period was one of gradual disillusionment. By 1997, when eight men tried to throw her husband from the eighth floor of his office in retaliation for helping to organize a national protest of the new taxes, he had lost all faith in the government. …

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