Thought-Provoking Shows about Teaching ; 'Max Bickford' Star Richard Dreyfuss Wants to Address Important Issues 'That Are Not Talked about Much on TV'

By M. S. Mason of the Christian Science Monitor | The Christian Science Monitor, March 1, 2002 | Go to article overview

Thought-Provoking Shows about Teaching ; 'Max Bickford' Star Richard Dreyfuss Wants to Address Important Issues 'That Are Not Talked about Much on TV'


M. S. Mason of the Christian Science Monitor, The Christian Science Monitor


"The Education of Max Bickford" started last September as a promising show about what it means to dedicate your life to helping young adults. But it quickly dissolved into a dreary, angst-ridden meditation on the trials of a middle-aged professor.

Then something fine happened: The writing improved, the storyline became more complex, and voila! The Education of Max Bickford (CBS, 8-9 p.m.) lives again.

Star Richard Dreyfuss is a funny, intelligent, and inventive actor who is playing Max out of a deep-rooted love for teaching. Dreyfuss, principally a movie actor who has now moved into TV, told critics last summer in Pasadena, Calif., that he always wanted to teach at the college level. The subject he loved most was history.

"Teaching is not just loving a subject. It's not only knowing how to think, but encouraging others to think greatly, widely. And it's not easy," says Mr. Dreyfuss, reached by phone on the "Bickford" set recently.

"It's one thing to be a history buff and to love this story or that story, and it's quite another to stand before kids and get them to participate with you and get them to think," he says. "That's one of the things I've come to realize about teaching."

Dreyfuss has visited classes at Columbia University in New York to research the role, and he has a number of friends who are professors.

"We now have a broader area to talk about" in the show, he says. "We're not just talking about [politics]; we're talking about teaching and the academic life - so, I've learned a lot from [real teachers]. What is the life? What are the issues? What is the interaction? How do they deal with kids and other faculty?"

Ethics comes with the territory of the show, he says. "People have interests in their lives that are not talked about much on TV. Whether they are issues about ethics, or family, or God, or the spirit, and we wanted to give those things some latitude.

"When I first came [to the producers], that's what I wanted to do - ask about how do you deal with death, or how do you deal with God, or the refusal to believe in God? That's what everyone does in reality."

It's clear that Dreyfuss has a hand in the storytelling. The writing reflects his passion for the subject, and he inhabits the role like, well, a real teacher. True, many of the stories are about his character interacting with friends and family. But he has created something unusual, something real, something of the nature of classroom communication.

Teachers and teaching are seldom the center of TV comedies and dramas - not like lawyers, for instance. But scenes from the classroom do show up in several shows like "Buffy, the Vampire Slayer," "Smallville," and "Dawson's Creek," though more as a teenage environment than the focus of teenage attention (she's a college dropout now, but when did Buffy ever study? …

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