After Party Election, Canadians Have Less Faith in Politics ; Pentecostal Preacher Stockwell Day Lost His Post as Leader of the Canadian Alliance

By Spendlove, Paul | The Christian Science Monitor, April 11, 2002 | Go to article overview

After Party Election, Canadians Have Less Faith in Politics ; Pentecostal Preacher Stockwell Day Lost His Post as Leader of the Canadian Alliance


Spendlove, Paul, The Christian Science Monitor


For years, religion was not an issue in Canadian politics. A politician's religious views were considered private and, it was assumed, would have little impact on his or her political decisions.

Two years ago, that began to change when Stockwell Day, a devout evangelical Christian, won the leadership of Canada's second- largest political party. A one-time lay Pentecostal preacher whose anti-abortion and family-values politics were well known, Mr. Day's surprise victory suggested that moral issues would return to the political debate.

But the growing influence of Canada's "religious right" suffered a setback late last month after Day failed in his bid to be reelected leader of the Canadian Alliance. His defeat suggests that Canada's moral conservatives are still a far cry from the level of influence of their devout brethren in the US.

"Fairly or unfairly, Day became a symbol of a form of political belief and activism that many Canadians would associate with elections south of the border, not with their own tradition," says Kevin Christiano, a sociologist from Notre Dame University in South Bend, Indiana, who specializes in Canadian politics.

It is not an easy comparison. Canada's social conservatives - predominately evangelical Protestants, but also some Roman Catholics and non-Christians - make up about 15 percent of the population, compared with about 30 percent in the US.

They also show less political cohesion. "I'd say we're about 10 years behind the US" in the level of political influence, says Brian Rushfeldt, executive director of the Alberta-based Canada Family Action Coalition.

Studies suggest that devout Christians who might agree with Day's opposition to abortion and gay rights do not necessarily gravitate toward the right-wing politics of the Canadian Alliance, says Dennis Hoover, a political scientist at Trinity College in Hartford, Conn. Mr. Hoover says social conservatives in Canada "are to the right of center on the moral issues, and pretty much at the center for other issues."

In some pockets of the country, such as the rural prairie district of Day's home province of Alberta, a mix of social and fiscal conservatism is not uncommon. As a provincial politician, Day opposed abortion while championing tougher treatment of criminals and funding for private religious schools. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

After Party Election, Canadians Have Less Faith in Politics ; Pentecostal Preacher Stockwell Day Lost His Post as Leader of the Canadian Alliance
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

    Already a member? Log in now.