Freedom, Rights Tested in Hong Kong ; Lawmakers This Week Proposed Tough New National Security Laws on Treason and Sedition

By Robert Marquand writer of The Christian Science Monitor | The Christian Science Monitor, September 27, 2002 | Go to article overview

Freedom, Rights Tested in Hong Kong ; Lawmakers This Week Proposed Tough New National Security Laws on Treason and Sedition


Robert Marquand writer of The Christian Science Monitor, The Christian Science Monitor


When the British handed Hong Kong back to China more than five years ago, Asia's glittering economic hub was abuzz with talk of preserving its legal autonomy and open character.

But under pressure from Beijing to be loyal, and worried about its waning economic clout, Hong Kong's plucky independent spirit is being tested.

Days after city leaders proposed a tough new set of national security laws designed to combat "subversion," a range of religious, human rights, and media groups say they may dramatically change the freedom and rights enjoyed in the former British colony.

Article 23 is "ultimately intended to shut down groups like mine," says Frank Lu, who runs the Information Center on Human Rights and Democratic Movement in China. "Slowly they are chipping away at anyone interested in democracy or dissenters."

In the past year, Hong Kong officials have tried to clarify what constitutes crimes against the state. The much anticipated Article 23 - worked out through invisible maneuvers between Hong Kong and Beijing - is considered a barometer of Hong Kong's autonomy under the "one country, two systems" policy dating to the 1997 handover.

To be adopted after a period of public consultation, Article 23 deals with treason, sedition, and illegal activities involving secession - a sensitive category given that Hong Kong is a center for pro-Taiwan and Tibet groups. But the city's appointed chief executive Tung Chee-hwa says it is "liberal and reasonable" and conforms with internationally recognized standards of security measures.

Hong Kong's autonomy has undergone a steady set of probes by Beijing this year. City leaders overruled a Hong Kong court's verdict on residency rights, siding with Beijing. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Freedom, Rights Tested in Hong Kong ; Lawmakers This Week Proposed Tough New National Security Laws on Treason and Sedition
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.