Cathedral Reflects a New Vision of Church ; Roman Catholic Cathedral Joins Other Churches in Trying to Bridge Sectarian Divides and Unite Sprawling Cities

By Daniel B. Wood writer of The Christian Science Monitor | The Christian Science Monitor, September 9, 2002 | Go to article overview

Cathedral Reflects a New Vision of Church ; Roman Catholic Cathedral Joins Other Churches in Trying to Bridge Sectarian Divides and Unite Sprawling Cities


Daniel B. Wood writer of The Christian Science Monitor, The Christian Science Monitor


After eight years of construction, the first major American cathedral to be built in three decades Monday begins to address the question marks hanging over its $189 million creation.

Like a number of newer Protestant mega-churches, the massive Roman Catholic structure - positioned atop the highest hill of downtown Los Angeles and next to one of the nation's busiest freeways - is trying to appeal more broadly than ever across religious, cultural, and ethnic lines.

"American churches of all kinds are trying to do everything they can to enlarge their tent, be seen, be accessible," says Jeanne Kilde, an expert on religious architecture at Macalester College in St. Paul, Minn. "There is more of a push in recent years to reach out, create a reputation that is as nonsectarian as possible and create somewhat of a neutral reputation to expand their usefulness as house of prayer for all people."

With its first public mass Sunday and ecumenical prayer services this Wednesday to commemorate the tragedy and heroes of Sept. 11, the edifice will begin to test this wider role in Los Angeles. Positioned by builders and many government officials as a sacred space for the entire city, the 12-story Cathedral of Our Lady of the Angels will also stand as the mother church for the nation's largest (5 million members) and most ethnically diverse Roman Catholic diocese.

Following other churches

In addition to the cathedral, two large, primarily black churches in Los Angeles have recently christened major new spaces in attempts to appeal beyond their own neighborhoods. Faithful Central Bible Church recently purchased the Los Angeles Forum basketball arena, and West Angeles Church of God and Christ opened a $60 million edifice.

The Catholic cathedral was built because St. Vibiana's, the 117- year-old cathedral it replaces, was severely damaged in a 1994 earthquake. Moreover, Catholic leaders and city officials had long lamented that the 1,200-seat structure was too small to accommodate major gatherings to mark celebrations or solemn moments.

City leaders recommended the new site, which is near a ring of government buildings, the Los Angeles Music Center, the new Staples Arena, and a soon-to-open Disney Concert Hall. The idea, say observers, was modeled on New York City, where two great cathedrals - the Catholic St. Patrick's Cathedral and the Episcopal St. John the Divine - have prominent civic roles.

The attempt to appeal across religions, ethnic lines, and age groups comes out of an even broader nationwide architectural movement, from symphony halls to sports arenas to museums, to provide a sense of communal place - a way to bring people together and out of isolation. …

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