Voters Stay Cautious on Ballot Measures ; Pricey Education Initiatives Pass, but Drug-Policy Reform and Healthcare Fall Flat

By Abraham McLaughlin writer of The Christian Science Monitor | The Christian Science Monitor, November 7, 2002 | Go to article overview

Voters Stay Cautious on Ballot Measures ; Pricey Education Initiatives Pass, but Drug-Policy Reform and Healthcare Fall Flat


Abraham McLaughlin writer of The Christian Science Monitor, The Christian Science Monitor


Not only did Americans tilt hard this year toward Republican candidates across the country, but on the myriad state ballot initiatives, they took a conservative and cautious approach to everything from election reform to marijuana legalization - with the notable exception of education.

It's a sign that the evolving American mood may extend beyond a new affinity for Republicans or President Bush. In fact, if the ballot initiatives are any clue, Americans are tipping toward a more status quo, less experimental approach in this time of fiscal uncertainty and terrorist threats.

Indeed, the most liberal of the nation's big ballot initiatives failed - universal health care in Oregon, marijuana legalization in Nevada, and same-day voter registration in California and Colorado. But five of six major education reforms passed, including Florida's plan to reduce class sizes and a universal preschool measure, despite big price tags for both.

"Voters ... voted to maintain the status quo more than anything else - although they have a huge soft spot for education," says M. Dane Waters of the Initiative and Referendum Institute, a conservative group in Washington.

Of all the major categories of initiatives, it was drug-policy reform - arguably one of the most liberal - that got the biggest drubbing. The Nevada marijuana plan failed. So did an Arizona effort to legalize medical marijuana and a plan to offer treatment, not jail time, to Ohio drug offenders. In South Dakota, even an initiative to legalize the cultivation and industrial processing of hemp - a plant from the marijuana family - was rejected.

Rejected, too, was an unusual South Dakota plan to allow defendants to argue not just their cases, but whether laws are fair.

Observers say the defeats represent Americans' ambivalence about drug legalization. A Time/CNN poll recently found that just 34 percent of Americans support making pot legal, but 80 percent support medical marijuana, and 72 percent say recreational pot users should be fined, not jailed. Yet with an impending war in Iraq, economic doldrums, and threats of terror, these social experiments didn't muster majority support. …

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