Rural Schools at a Disadvantage in the Current Education-Reform Climate

By Belsie, Laurent | The Christian Science Monitor, February 18, 2003 | Go to article overview

Rural Schools at a Disadvantage in the Current Education-Reform Climate


Belsie, Laurent, The Christian Science Monitor


America's rural students face a bumpy, uncertain ride into the future of education reform. Looming state cuts and, ironically, the administration's Leave No Child Behind reform initiative will make it tougher for already struggling rural school districts to cope, according to a report released last week. Rural schools in 13 states need particularly urgent attention, warned the rural-education group that wrote the report.

"There'll be a drain of the best teachers out of many rural schools," says Marty Strange, coauthor of the report and policy director of Rural School and Community Trust, based in Washington.

The problem isn't test scores, it's resources. Although rural schools educate a surprising number of children in the US - nearly one-third attend a facility in hamlets or small towns of fewer than 25,000 people - they're largely invisible. State and federal policymakers spend far more time looking at the challenges of urban and suburban schools. Thus, mandates and reforms can put rural districts at a disadvantage.

For example: President Bush's reform plan encourages schools to compete for the best teachers. That plan works well for wealthy suburban districts, which can afford to attract good teachers, but it makes life tougher for poorer districts that can't offer competitive salaries, Mr. Strange says.

Another flaw, he says, are the sanctions imposed on schools when they don't measure up in standardized tests. Such benchmarks work well in large districts, where 100 or more students take a particular test. But research suggests scores will swing dramatically in rural schools where the entire fourth-grade class may include only 10 students. One really good or poor test taker may skew the overall results so much, he warns, that a school's year-to- year performance will prove difficult to measure. …

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