College Sports and the Myth of Amateurism

By Sack, Allen L. | The Christian Science Monitor, March 17, 2003 | Go to article overview

College Sports and the Myth of Amateurism


Sack, Allen L., The Christian Science Monitor


With the arrival of spring, comes madness. College basketball madness, that is. As a nation prepares for war, sports writers are turning their attention toward the season-ending tournament that generates the NCAA a $6 billion multiyear TV contract from CBS. Millions more rain down from corporate sponsorships, the sale of licensed merchandise, luxury seating, parking, concessions, and other revenue streams. Some new basketball arenas look more like shopping malls.

Aside from the pretournament type, another story is grabbing sports-page headlines. Controversy is piling up around the talented athletes who make such events possible. It concerns this question: Do the players deserve a greater share of the revenue they help generate?

In Nebraska, state Sen. Ernie Chambers has introduced a bill that would require college football players to be paid a stipend in addition to the athletic scholarships they currently receive.

Ironically, the NCAA, the organization that transformed March Madness into a multibillion-dollar commercial extravaganza, has voiced opposition to the proposal on the grounds that it contradicts a long-standing commitment to amateur principles. College sports is an educational enterprise, they say, not a business.

This sort of rhetoric is appealing to those of us who like to think that college athletes are simply students who play sports during their free time. The harsh reality, however, is that over the past three decades, the NCAA has taken commercialism to heights few people could have ever imagined. Participation in big-time college sports has become virtually indistinguishable from full-time employment.

When I played football for the University of Notre Dame in the 1960s, the NCAA had already compromised its half-century commitment to amateur principles. In 1956, NCAA rules allowed universities to offer talented players "scholarships" to pay for room, board, tuition, and fees. Nonetheless, the four-year "no cut" scholarship I received back then drove home the point that Notre Dame was committed to me as a student for four years, regardless of my performance on the playing field. As a result, not only did I enjoy the success of playing on a championship team, I got the message that education was what really mattered. …

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