Endangered-Species Clone Inspires Hope, Concern ; Birth of Rare Banteng Calves from a Cloned Cell Is a Landmark, but Its Future Role in Conservation Is Uncertain

By Peter N. Spotts writer of The Christian Science Monitor | The Christian Science Monitor, April 1, 2003 | Go to article overview

Endangered-Species Clone Inspires Hope, Concern ; Birth of Rare Banteng Calves from a Cloned Cell Is a Landmark, but Its Future Role in Conservation Is Uncertain


Peter N. Spotts writer of The Christian Science Monitor, The Christian Science Monitor


A small calf stands in a cattle stall on a farm outside Sioux Center, Iowa, and peers outward with the doe-eyed charm that would make it a natural poster pet for a local 4-H Club.

This calf, however, is unique. Native to the island of Java, the week-old banteng calf is the longest-surviving clone of an endangered animal. It represents the most successful attempt yet for efforts to see whether cloning - a deeply controversial technology for human-related research - can become a feasible tool to help save endangered species.

Yet it also is a field of research where success is still measured in days. The calf is one of two cloned banteng born last week. The second, born at twice a banteng's typical birth weight of 40 pounds, was euthanized on Tuesday. Two years ago, researchers cloned an endangered wild ox they named Noah, only to lose the calf two days later to an unrelated illness.

Still, the fact that the two banteng arrived at all is a landmark, researchers say.

"I was absolutely astounded when I saw the picture of the living animal that came from one of these cells that came out of our freezers," says Oliver Ryder, a geneticist at the San Diego Zoo's Center for Reproduction of Endangered Species, which supplied the genetic material to clone the calves.

For years, Dr. Ryder and a group of colleagues have argued that researchers should begin building DNA "banks" where tissue and other sources of genetic and reproductive material from endangered species would be archived. San Diego Zoo began to store samples in its "frozen zoo" in 1976 and now has collections of viable cells from more than 3,200 mammals representing 355 species and subspecies - all preserved at liquid-nitrogen temperatures.

Surrogate mothers

The zoo shipped banteng cells preserved since 1980 to Advanced Cell Technology, a Worcester, Mass., biotech firm. There, technicians took DNA from the samples and transferred it to domestic cow eggs that had been stripped of their DNA. ACT fertilized the modified eggs and shipped the resulting embryos to another biotech company in Sioux Center, Iowa, where they were implanted in 30 cows. Sixteen cows became pregnant; two came to term.

The procedure's inefficiency and the loss of the second banteng calf clearly indicate that conservation cloning is not ready for prime time, researchers acknowledge, noting that the banteng experiment was designed to help assess the technique's feasibility.

Others acknowledge that such cloning experiments may be of scientific value. …

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Endangered-Species Clone Inspires Hope, Concern ; Birth of Rare Banteng Calves from a Cloned Cell Is a Landmark, but Its Future Role in Conservation Is Uncertain
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