Madeleine Albright and Andrew Kohut ; Excerpts from a Monitor Breakfast on the Pew Global Attitudes Project

By Cook, David T. | The Christian Science Monitor, June 4, 2003 | Go to article overview

Madeleine Albright and Andrew Kohut ; Excerpts from a Monitor Breakfast on the Pew Global Attitudes Project


Cook, David T., The Christian Science Monitor


Tuesday's breakfast guests are the leaders of the Pew Global Attitudes project.

The project's chair is Madeleine Albright, the 64th Secretary of State.

Secretary Albright is now a principal in her own strategic consulting firm, the Albright Group, as well as a professor at the Georgetown School of Foreign Service and a distinguished scholar at the University of Michigan.

Andrew Kohut is the project director for the Global Attitudes effort.

He is currently Director of the Pew Research Center for The People & The Press. On his way to Pew, he served as President of The Gallup Organization and then as founder of Princeton Survey Research Associates. He was also founding director of surveys for the Times Mirror Center.

For further information on the survey, please visit: www.people- press.org.

On how world public opinion has changed since the war on Iraq:

Kohut: "The new May survey, the update, shows the world's public further divided by the Gulf War but at the same time the broader survey shows wide support for fundamental economic and political values that the US has long promoted....The very bad news is that there is a great deal of collateral damage to public opinion from the war in Iraq. The image of the United States has fallen even further. The current ratings are well below last year's measures in favorability ratings and last year's measures were well below what the State Department was showing in 1999 and 2000.

On US-European relations:

Kohut: "The headline we had last year when we talked to you that the attitude toward America has soured, well it has soured even further.... The rift between Americans and Western Europeans has widened. Large majorities of Europeans say they want a less-close diplomatic and security relationship with the United States and opinions are strained on both sides of the Atlantic. Only 53 percent of Americans say they want to continue a close relationship with the Europeans."

On US-Muslim relations:

Kohut: "Most dramatically, the bottom has fallen out of support for America in most of the Muslim world. Antagonism toward the United States has both deepened and widened."

On the US viewed as a threat:

Kohut: "Unlike anti-Americanism in other parts of the world, Muslim publics not only dislike the United States but they dislike Americans. The percentage of Muslims thinking we are a serious threat to Islam has increased in most countries. It goes as high as 97 percent in Jordan and 91 percent in the Palestinian Authority. Majorities in 7 of 8 Muslim populations even think that the US might become a military threat to their country."

On support for the United Nations:

Kohut: "Global public support for the United Nations has tumbled. Positive ratings for the UN have tumbled in nearly every country for which we have measures."

On a new world order:

Albright: "What is evident is that we are in the post, post 9-11 world. …

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