How a Scientist Swung into the Truth ; Leon Foucault's Pendulum Proved What Scientists Knew, but Nobody before Him Could Show: The World Turns

By Cowen, Robert C. | The Christian Science Monitor, October 2, 2003 | Go to article overview

How a Scientist Swung into the Truth ; Leon Foucault's Pendulum Proved What Scientists Knew, but Nobody before Him Could Show: The World Turns


Cowen, Robert C., The Christian Science Monitor


This intriguing account of the work of a 19th-century French physicist exemplifies a lesson that humanity seems forever reluctant to learn: How the world appears depends on your frame of reference. Someone else with a different reference frame can have a different world view that is equally valid. The trick is to translate between reference frames and find the underlying truth.

That's the trick Leon Foucault pulled off 152 years ago when he presented the first definitive evidence of Earth's rotation. You can see that evidence today in many museums where a pendulum swings ponderously over a sand-covered platform. The track it traces in the sand rotates 360 degrees as the world turns.

Such unequivocal proof of Earth's rotation eluded the most skillful seekers for thousands of years. The spin has no obvious effect on our everyday reference frame: the ever-changing sky above and the seemly motionless ground beneath. It's easy to believe the sky rotates around a stationary orb. When Foucault showed this common-sense perception to be deceptive, a stubbornly held world view changed forever. (Galileo knew the truth earlier but couldn't demonstrate it.)

This triumph of scientific thinking over faith-based misconception is the hero of Amir Aczel's "Pendulum." Though not a biography of Foucault, it does sketch key details of his life. And these make the point that you can't fully understand a scientist's work divorced from its political, religious, and social context.

Foucault was a brilliant engineer, but a self-taught, mathematically naive physicist. Members of the French Academy of Sciences despised him. He might have been sidetracked but for the help of a higher power: Napoleon III became a self-taught amateur scientist during his years in exile and in prison and felt an affinity with the self-taught physicist. As Emperor of France, he saw to it that Foucault had the honors and resources he needed.

Foucault's experiment confronted misguided religious faith. Its physics relies on a different kind of faith. We explain the physics today in terms of a force described by French engineer Gastard- Gustave Coriolis 16 years before Foucault swung his pendulum. …

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