Mad Cow Weighs Down a $175 Billion Industry ; New Slaughterhouse Procedures, Such as Barring 'Downer' Cattle from the Food Supply, Aim to Keep Beef Sales Healthy

By Brad Knickerbocker writer of The Christian Science Monitor | The Christian Science Monitor, January 5, 2004 | Go to article overview

Mad Cow Weighs Down a $175 Billion Industry ; New Slaughterhouse Procedures, Such as Barring 'Downer' Cattle from the Food Supply, Aim to Keep Beef Sales Healthy


Brad Knickerbocker writer of The Christian Science Monitor, The Christian Science Monitor


The first weeks of the mad-cow scare in the US are rippling out through the nation's economy.

In one way or another - from the tons of pet food made of "meat byproducts" for nearly 140 million cats and dogs, to the $200 million in beef waiting aboard ships and in port freezers, to meat- processing and trucking companies sending workers home - the $175 billion industry affects many millions of Americans.

"Beef. It's What's for Dinner," proclaims the National Cattlemen's Beef Association, and American eating habits bear that out. Some 78 million meals featuring beef are served every day, according to industry and government figures, and it's not just the pot roast or filet mignon. Beef extract made from the remains of slaughtered cows is in taco fillings, pizza toppings, and other popular foods as well.

Whether or not they're regular red-meat eaters, Americans are watching the situation closely. While two-thirds still think the beef supply is safe, according to a CNN-Time poll released over the weekend, a substantial 27 percent think otherwise, and they have either reduced their consumption of beef or stopped eating it altogether.

Officials think they know - but still aren't absolutely certain - where the Holstein slaughtered a month ago and later diagnosed with bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) came from, as well as how it contracted mad-cow disease. Most of the 81 cows in the suspect herd have yet to be tracked down. Livestock on a third farm in Washington State have now been quarantined. US Department of Agriculture officials hope to be able to account for the 20,000 pounds of recalled meat in the next few days.

But as new information on the case is revealed almost daily, it's unclear what the long-term economic impact will be.

"The US beef export market lost to mad-cow disease won't come back anytime soon," says Purdue University agricultural economist Philip Paarlberg. "We are going to have to assure our trading partners that the beef supply is safe, and that will take time."

"The mad-cow trade restrictions the United States imposed on Canada on May 20 remained rigid until Aug. 8, and even then the restrictions were only partially eased," says Dr. Paarlberg. "In the world's view, it's a North American beef market, not two separate countries."

The US Department of Agriculture (USDA) is moving quickly to address the issue. Among the new rules for beef production: "Downer" cattle (those injured or too sick to stand on their own) may not be used for human food; slaughtered animals inspected for mad-cow disease may not be processed for sale until test results are known; slaughterhouse techniques that can mix brain or spinal-cord tissue with muscle meat must not be used. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Mad Cow Weighs Down a $175 Billion Industry ; New Slaughterhouse Procedures, Such as Barring 'Downer' Cattle from the Food Supply, Aim to Keep Beef Sales Healthy
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.