Definition of 'Jew' Confronts Israel ; Thousands of Ethiopian Jews Who Were Pressured to Convert to Christianity Are Waiting to Move to Israel

By Ben Lynfield Correspondent of The Christian Science Monitor | The Christian Science Monitor, January 9, 2004 | Go to article overview

Definition of 'Jew' Confronts Israel ; Thousands of Ethiopian Jews Who Were Pressured to Convert to Christianity Are Waiting to Move to Israel


Ben Lynfield Correspondent of The Christian Science Monitor, The Christian Science Monitor


Mikoyet Zighaya is an Israeli with a grievance.

Dressed in army fatigues, his black beret tucked onto his shoulder, he joined a protest this week of more than a thousand Ethiopian Israelis. They demanded that their relatives be brought to Israel in keeping with a government decision last year to expedite the immigration of about 20,000 Ethiopians waiting to join previous waves and trickles of Ethiopian immigrants.

But now several key ministers are starting to openly question the decision, citing a lack of funding and raising questions about the Jewishness of those waiting. Mr. Zighaya's hopes of being reunited with his handicapped father, Albache, who has been waiting to come to Israel for six years, appear to be fading.

A banner nearby proclaims: "Blacks are Jews, too," and the crowd, holding up pictures of their relatives, chants "Mama," "Papa," "Sister," "Grandma."

"Sometimes I ask myself why I serve this country when they are casting away my father," Zighaya says.

The vast majority of those waiting are Falash Mura, people whose ancestors converted to Christianity under pressure or by choice but who consider themselves Jews.

The controversy over whether they should be allowed to immigrate en masse from their huts and shacks - where they survive off the largesse of American Jewish donors - pits the once-sacred ethos of ingathering Jewish exiles against the vagaries of Israeli politics. And it raises tough questions not only about how Israel defines who is a Jew but also whether color and economic status determine who can become Israeli.

The issue, which began bubbling when Ethiopian Israelis saw the cabinet decision was not being implemented, erupted last week. Absorption Minister Tzipi Livne said flatly that there is not enough money to implement a rapid, large-scale immigration.

Thursday, Foreign Minister Silvan Shalom said that the current pace of immigration - about 300 Ethiopians a month - is too slow. "We have to take all considerations into account, but I would very much like to see this problem behind us," he told Israel radio from Ethiopia.

Livne says it is far more expensive to absorb Ethiopians than other immigrants. In an affirmative action to make up for their impoverished background - most were farmers - the government pays for Ethiopian immigrants to live in absorption centers for two years and underwrites their mortgages. Often the older generation is unable to adjust to Israel's high-tech market economy, which means they are given extended welfare payments. Livne says that many among those waiting are opportunists simply claiming to be Jewish in order to gain access to a better life in Israel.

Her critics, however, argue that during past waves, including that of hundreds of thousands of North African Jews during the 1950s, cost was never an obstacle. "When did the state of Israel ever make economic calculations about immigration?" says Avraham Neguise, head of an advocacy group for Ethiopians. "They travel the world trying to encourage immigration from Russia, the United States, and Canada, but for Ethiopians, they do not have enough money. …

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