Letters

The Christian Science Monitor, May 6, 2004 | Go to article overview

Letters


Abu Ghraib abuse: degrees of outrage

Regarding your May 3 article "To Arabs, photos confirm brutal US": It's understandable that Iraqis and the rest of the world should feel a sense of revulsion at pictures of prisoners being abused. One wishes they had expressed a similar sense of outrage at the burning of the corpses of the American contractors not too long ago, the cold-blooded execution of an Italian prisoner, or the videotaping of reporter Daniel Pearl's beheading. Instead, the best they could muster was an attitude of defiance or jubilant cheering in the streets of Baghdad. What a fickle bunch they are, indeed. Miguel A. Guanipa Whitinsville, Mass.

I propose that such reprehensible behavior is not surprising. Teaching, learning, and worst of all, practicing the killing of fellow human beings is in itself dehumanizing. It is noted in the article that, without broad surveillance, such violence will continue, "be it Iraqis against Americans or, in this horrifying instance, Americans against Iraqis." Intentional killing, for any reason, cannot promote intended good or lasting peace.

Though I have never been present in a war zone, I have been afforded too many opportunities to ponder what such an experience must entail. I firmly believe that such an experience has the potential of turning even the best of us into the worst perpetrator of abhorrent behavior. It would take great spiritual and moral stamina to prevent such occurrences in the midst of warfare. In order to repair our image in the Middle East, as the article correctly points out, we need a fairer policy that would promote and bring about lasting peace. Susan G. Lapointe Lexington, Mass.

Abu Ghraib is no My Lai

Regarding your May 3 editorial "Sadistic Abuse of Iraqi Inmates:" Your comparison of the terribly unfortunate but now vastly over- reported incidents involving a few American military police and Iraqi prisoners with the 1968 My Lai massacre only exposes your consistent political bias. These two situations are in no way similar. The huge majority of US soldiers are done a great disservice by media fixation with atypical incidents. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Letters
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.