In Normandy, US Flag Symbolizes the Liberation of 1944

By Peter Ford writer of The Christian Science Monitor | The Christian Science Monitor, June 7, 2004 | Go to article overview

In Normandy, US Flag Symbolizes the Liberation of 1944


Peter Ford writer of The Christian Science Monitor, The Christian Science Monitor


The Bar de l'Esperance on the main square of this small Normandy town is a riot of red, white, and blue. Stars and Stripes drape every wall, rosettes decorate every nook and cranny, and hanging from the ceiling is an artifact not often seen in Europe these days - an image of the Statue of Liberty emblazoned with the words, "I Love USA."

Odette Durosier, the cafe's owner, had pulled out all the stops for Sunday's 60th anniversary of D-Day to honor the men who came ashore a few miles away, on Omaha Beach. "You have to bow to the Americans and the others who came here," she said last week, as she put on the finishing touches to her decorations.

But she does not want her message to be misunderstood. "The American flag means freedom, not the American government," she said, polishing a glass behind the bar. "It's not a question of politics."

A customer cut in. "For us, that flag means liberty. Today in other parts of the world it represents more like an invader," said Francoise Castel.

Against a background of the Iraq war, which remains intensely unpopular in France and elsewhere in Europe, the anniversary was an opportunity for the citizens of Normandy to remember the days when nobody doubted the purity of American arms.

Sixty years ago, when President Roosevelt prayed on national radio for God to bless the Normandy invasion as "a struggle to preserve our Republic, our religion, and our civilization, and to set free a suffering humanity," few around the world questioned his view.

Today, suggests Christophe Mezerette, a local journalist, "George Bush does not seem very credible" when casting the US-led war on terror - and the Iraqi front of that war - in the same light. "It is seen here as a war of interests, with something else behind it," he said.

That has not stopped him and his wife from hanging an American flag from the gables of their home, alongside the Normandy pennant - two golden lions rampant on a red background. "We know that veterans will come by here, and the flag is a sign we have not forgotten them."

Jean-Jacques Gravey, a retired plumber who lives just around the corner from a street named in honor of the 2nd American Division, remembers when he looked out of the window of a friend's house where he had gone for shelter, and saw men from that division for the first time in June 1944. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

In Normandy, US Flag Symbolizes the Liberation of 1944
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

    Already a member? Log in now.