A Wave of Initiatives to Promote Marriage ; Interest Groups Concerned with Aggressive Moves to Legislate Most Personal of Institutions

By Gail Russell Chaddock writer of The Christian Science Monitor | The Christian Science Monitor, May 4, 2004 | Go to article overview

A Wave of Initiatives to Promote Marriage ; Interest Groups Concerned with Aggressive Moves to Legislate Most Personal of Institutions


Gail Russell Chaddock writer of The Christian Science Monitor, The Christian Science Monitor


Call it Bush v. Murphy Brown: the rematch. After the spring of 1992, when Vice President Dan Quayle denounced CBS TV character Murphy Brown for bearing a child alone and calling it "just another lifestyle choice," the vice president's moralistic tone became grist for political humorists for years to come.

Now, a new Bush administration and GOP Congress are reengaging in the nation's culture war, once again focusing on the institution of marriage. But this time, they say, no one is laughing - evidence showing the benefits of marriage to children is more compelling than ever.

From a proposed constitutional amendment to outlaw same-sex marriage to new funding for programs to promote "healthy" marriage at the state level, Washington is making an unprecedented move into one of the most private and pivotal institutions in American life.

"In a remarkably short period of time, we have moved past the question of whether government ought to be involved in supporting healthy marriages to the ques- tion of how government should be involved," said Wade Horn, assistant Secretary for children and families in the Department of Health and Human Services, before a Senate panel last week.

So far, many of the new moves are modest - and in their infancy. But critics say that such programs could involve government in a relationship where it does not belong, and produce misguided policy, including encouraging women and children to stay in a possibly violent household.

New federal moves are wide-ranging. Among them: eliminating barriers to marriage - such as the permanent repeal of the so- called "marriage penalty" in the US tax code, which the House passed last week, and a pending rewrite of national welfare laws to provide $300 million in incentives for programs to promote "healthy" married families.

Meanwhile, several states have also launched a spate of new initiatives, with the most detailed legislation coming out of the conservative South and Southwest. Since the mid-1990s, all states have made at least one policy change to promote marriage or reduce divorce.

Forty now fund couples- and marriage-related services. And 36 have revised their welfare eligibility rules to include two- parent families. Nine states now offer bonuses for marriage.

"It is worth noting that there is little marriage-related policy activity in the northeastern states, and two of the three most populous states [California and New York] have no appreciable state marriage initiatives," according to a new report by the Center for Law and Social Policy in Washington.

In Senate hearings last week, lawmakers also discussed whether Washington should make it harder for couples to end a marriage, by challenging several states' "no-fault" divorce laws.

"Tell me the wisdom of a system where it is easier to get a marriage license than a hunting license, or where it is easier to get out of a marriage than a Tupperware contract," said former Gov. Frank Keating (R) of Oklahoma before a Senate panel on "Healthy Marriage" last week. …

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