Iran Defiant over Nuclear Censure ; A UN Watchdog Is Expected to Criticize Iran for Lack of Nuclear- Programs Cooperation

By Scott Peterson writer of The Christian Science Monitor | The Christian Science Monitor, June 18, 2004 | Go to article overview

Iran Defiant over Nuclear Censure ; A UN Watchdog Is Expected to Criticize Iran for Lack of Nuclear- Programs Cooperation


Scott Peterson writer of The Christian Science Monitor, The Christian Science Monitor


Pressure is building over Iran's nuclear programs, as the UN's nuclear watchdog expects to vote Friday to strongly rebuke the Islamic Republic for inadequate cooperation.

The degree of frustration with Iran - and its frequently changing explanations about key aspects of its declarations, as spelled out in several reports by the UN's International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) - is growing among diplomats and inspectors alike.

Diplomatic jousting has intensified this week. Europe and the US have pushed for a tough resolution. But now Iranian leaders say they may reconsider ties with the IAEA if the 35-member board of governors, meeting in Vienna this week, does not mute its criticism.

Iran counterattacked Thursday after the UN acknowledged that it had wrongfully accused Iran in its June 1 report of not declaring imported parts for advanced P-2 centrifuges, which could be used to make nuclear weapons.

"This has been a big mistake," said Hossein Moussavian, secretary of the foreign policy committee of Iran's Supreme National Security Council. "It shows Iranian cooperation, Iranian information has been full and precise, on time, with no contradictions and no changes period."

Nevertheless, Mohamed ElBaradei, the IAEA director general, said the resolution will ask Iran to "accelerate cooperation."

Mr. ElBaradei noted that "lack of clarity" persisted about Iran's centrifuge program, which he suggested may be too large for research alone. Diplomats say the resolution "deplores" Iran's foot- dragging, and expresses "serious concern."

President Mohamed Khatami declared Wednesday that Iran was no longer bound by any "moral commitment" to continue suspending uranium enrichment, and could reject the IAEA decision. Several hundred Iranian hardliners took to nuclear sites in Iran Wednesday, accusing the West of injustice and vowing to defend atomic assets with their lives.

Though the IAEA was not expected to formalize a deadline for complete Iranian compliance - a wish of US officials, who accuse Iran of secretly pursuing nuclear weapons under the facade of a peaceful energy program - the fact that the vote was spearheaded by Britain, France, and Germany underscores Iran's growing isolation on the issue.

The foreign ministers of the EU-3, as diplomats refer to the troika, negotiated with Tehran last October. Iran agreed to total openness and tougher inspections, and to suspend uranium enrichment, in exchange for assistance with peaceful power programs.

But IAEA reporting shows that Iran continued with some of its enrichment activities, has waffled on damaging details, and delayed opening some military sites. Indeed, European concerns in the past about how sensitive IAEA wording might offend Iran is noticeably absent this time.

"If the Europeans had done significantly less, they would have run into stiff opposition [from IAEA nations]," says Michael Levi, a nuclear expert at the Brookings Institution in Washington. …

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