Reporters on the Job

The Christian Science Monitor, August 31, 2004 | Go to article overview

Reporters on the Job


* Book Clubs for Men: For correspondent Mark Rice-Oxley, the story about a men-only book club in England (page 1) hits close to home. His wife belongs to an all-women book club. "There's been some discussion of getting the spouses or boyfriends to come, maybe once a year. But they're not keen on it," he says. "When it's held at my house, I can sometimes hear the discussion. I desperately wanted to pipe up at the last one."

They were discussing a bestseller here, "The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Nighttime" by Mark Haddon. The book is written from the perspective of a 15-year-old boy diagnosed with autism.

"I could hear members of my wife's club saying that a central theme was how difficult it must be for the parents of the child," says Mark. "But for me, the book was about how this boy saw the world in a clearer, crisper light than the supposedly sane, normal people. I told my wife later that I didn't think her group was reading it in the right way. She replied, 'That's exactly why you've not been invited to participate.' "

* Greek-US Parallels: Correspondent Coral Davenport went out on the streets of Athens to ask Greeks their views of the two central female figures involved in organizing the Olympic Games (this page). …

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