Melting Snow with My Fingertips ; for Kids

The Christian Science Monitor, August 31, 2004 | Go to article overview

Melting Snow with My Fingertips ; for Kids


Amy was excited. Her family had moved to a new house, and she was going to a new school. On the first day of class, the teacher introduced her to the other third-graders, and one of them took her for a tour of the school so she wouldn't get lost. It was going to be a good year, she was sure.

But after the second week, she began to wonder. The girls in her class weren't acting very friendly, and they wouldn't play with her. One night when she was in her bedroom, her mother came in and found her crying.

"What's the matter?" asked Mom.

"Oh, Mom, the girls at school don't like me. They run away from me on the playground, and they won't let me play with them."

Mom put her arms around Amy. "What about finding another girl to play with? There must be someone who needs a friend."

"Everyone already has a friend," complained Amy. When Mom raised an eyebrow, she added, "Really, Mom, I've tried!"

"So what do you think the problem is?"

"My teacher said all the girls in my class have been together since kindergarten, so they're used to each other."

"And what does that mean?"

"It means they don't need any more friends - at least that's what they told me."

"Did your teacher talk with the girls?"

"Uh-huh. She told them to play with me, but they won't."

Mom sat quietly and thought a moment. "I think we need to pray about this, don't you?"

Amy nodded. "Do you think we could call Mrs. Bready?" Mrs. Bready was a family friend and Christian Science practitioner.

Mom thought that was a good idea, too.

Amy asked Mom if she could talk with Mrs. Bready on the phone by herself. Eventually, Amy came out to the living room with a sweet smile on her face and said she was ready for bed.

Amy didn't talk about what Mrs. Bready said, but Mom noticed over the next couple of days that Amy seemed happier. …

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