Still, the Birds Keep Singing ; Adapted from the Christian Science Sentinel

The Christian Science Monitor, July 19, 2004 | Go to article overview

Still, the Birds Keep Singing ; Adapted from the Christian Science Sentinel


I know a man who, when he lost at sports as a young man, would sometimes verbally abuse his family. He tended to talk too much and too loudly. In a way, he was an extremist. But as he really worked to temper his thoughts - to be more loving and truthful - he became more pleasant to be around.

His experience makes me think of something the founder of this newspaper, Mary Baker Eddy, wrote, "We protect our dwellings more securely after a robbery, and our jewels have been stolen; so, after losing those jewels of character, - temperance, virtue, and truth, - the young man is awakened to bar his door against further robberies" ("Miscellaneous Writings 1883-1896," page 201).

Many people may think of extreme behavior not so much in terms of the man described above, as in terms of the religious fanaticism that manipulates boys and girls to detonate themselves as suicide bombers, or that plans retaliatory violence in the name of religious doctrines. Nevertheless, convictions that are far from moderate, or temperate, are common today in politics, religion, and sports - in daily life around the world.

Still, the birds keep singing. That's the thought that crossed my mind as I drove past lawn posters with strident political messages, on my way to vote this morning. We have a pair of beautiful Baltimore orioles hanging their little bag-nest from a tree branch in our yard. I thought if they could read these signs, they might stop singing. But since they can't, they continue to favor us with their liquid, lilting melody.

I remember from an ornithology class that many birds sing to establish and protect their territories. That strikes me as a wonderfully civilized and moderate way to set boundaries and exercise personal preferences. More tenors. Fewer terrorists. It reminds me that ways exist for us humans to resolve local and international conflicts with less extreme rhetoric and violent behavior.

But perhaps this is where ornithology has to give way to the teachings of Jesus. To me, the bedrock of his teaching was love for God and our neighbor. And he taught a special kind of love - a love for God that rises above the extremism of mortal attachment.

This love molded Jesus to be kind, as well as thoughtful and reasonable. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Still, the Birds Keep Singing ; Adapted from the Christian Science Sentinel
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.