Damon's Antihero Returns for Round 2

By Gloria Goodale writer of The Christian Science Monitor | The Christian Science Monitor, July 23, 2004 | Go to article overview

Damon's Antihero Returns for Round 2


Gloria Goodale writer of The Christian Science Monitor, The Christian Science Monitor


More than guns and cars, unshakable confidence is what keeps the classic spy hero James Bond alive. But, says the team behind "The Bourne Supremacy," today's spy yarns demand a more complex hero.

Enter Matt Damon, whose combination of youthful vulnerability and outsider skepticism make him born (or should we say Bourne?) to play the conflicted antihero.

The star of "The Bourne Supremacy," this summer's followup to the Ludlum franchise that (re)-launched two years ago (a TV miniseries ran in the 1980s), says doubt and uncertainty are key to moving the entire spy genre into today's confusing and dangerous world.

"That's the reason to do the film in this day and age," says star Matt Damon, who says he was attracted to the complexity of the role. The character is defined by his need for answers, he says. "And to take someone that we've established as the ultimate American weapon - and then take him on a journey of self-discovery - takes the audience on a journey of discovery about itself and its own country," he says.

Spy flicks thrive on distrust

"We're living in questioning times," says director Paul Greengrass, who adds that the intersection between the personal and the political is what interests him. "Many people feel that their governments have let them down, kept secrets from them, lied to them about the war and about terrorism," he says. "The consequence is a tide of cynicism, very analogous to the late 1960s and early '70s," he says, adding "a spy thriller is a very effective way to tap into those inchoate feelings and respond to that great swirling tide of mistrust."

Nearly the entire team re-unites for this chapter in the Bourne odyssey, with the exception of the director. Given the darker, politically charged tone of the film, the producers chose Mr. Greengrass (who directed the 2002 film "Bloody Sunday" about the 1972 clash between British soldiers and Irish civil-rights workers), yet another European director with a reputation for making edgy, provocative art house films.

"Paul brings that political side to the film," says producer Frank Marshall, adding, "[The film] represents a lot of countries trying to find their identities, what their role is in the world today. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Damon's Antihero Returns for Round 2
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.