Another Approach to the Stem-Cell Debate ; Bringing a Spiritual Perspective to Daily Life

The Christian Science Monitor, September 16, 2004 | Go to article overview

Another Approach to the Stem-Cell Debate ; Bringing a Spiritual Perspective to Daily Life


Today's debate on stem-cell research reminds us how intense the search for relief from pain and disease continues to be. Just as the ancient alchemist searched for the elixir of life, the research scientist searches for a cure for disease today.

The need remains urgent. Fewer people are willing to accept the orthodox counsel to endure suffering today in order to reap the promise of bliss hereafter. Many more feel certain that an answer exists, that a cure can be found. History teaches us that many virulent diseases of the past have been conquered. But sad to say they have been replaced by others. Life expectancy may be longer today, but the incidence of disease is not decreasing.

The search continues and sometimes leads people to look for answers in unexpected directions. That was certainly the case for Mary Baker Eddy, the author of "Science and Health with Key to the Scriptures" and the Discoverer of Christian Science.

She suffered from serious ill health for several decades. She and her family explored all the options they could find and/or afford. Sometimes she found temporary relief, but not a lasting cure. Writing about this long search and its disappointments, she explained: "The author's medical researches and experiments had prepared her thought for the metaphysics of Christian Science. Every material dependence had failed her in her search for truth; and she can now understand why, and can see the means by which mortals are divinely driven to a spiritual source for health and happiness" (page 152).

Not helped by medicine, Mrs. Eddy continued to turn with Job- like determination to the Bible, and to prayer, for an answer. She was convinced that the God she knew, the God she believed in, could not be unmerciful. She was sure that God would not cause pain and would not permit it to be inflicted on His children. As no human parent would do this, how could the divine Parent permit this?

Searching the Bible inspired her to view life from an entirely different perspective. She was healed of the ills that had plagued her for so many years, and learned that we have to divorce ourselves from the view that life is formed and governed by the flesh, and instead to embrace the idea that life is spiritual, formed and governed by God. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Another Approach to the Stem-Cell Debate ; Bringing a Spiritual Perspective to Daily Life
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.