Doors Closing, Hearts Opening ; Bringing a Spiritual Perspective to Daily Life

The Christian Science Monitor, September 23, 2004 | Go to article overview

Doors Closing, Hearts Opening ; Bringing a Spiritual Perspective to Daily Life


I came home one afternoon to find my husband sitting at the kitchen table, abruptly laid off from a job he'd held for almost two decades.

He numbly talked about retiring.

I immediately began to pray, making the transition to a calmer state of thought by being grateful for the many years of answered prayer I had witnessed in my life. I reaffirmed that whatever we did now would be done happily, under God's guidance. I even began to see this as an opportunity to relocate to a new area, closer to a loved relative, and to be able to spend more time with my husband.

As a little girl, when my dad's work compelled us to move again and again, my mother and grandmother encouraged me to take into the "closet of prayer" the idea that God is everywhere and that He loves me; so any change in circumstances couldn't deprive me of happiness. I found this to be true in each of the 22 moves my family made before I was 18.

The idea of the "closet of prayer" is biblical. When my grandmother and mother had begun to study Christian Science in the 1930s, they turned for guidance to Jesus' words: "When thou prayest, enter into thy closet, and when thou hast shut thy door, pray to thy Father which is in secret; and thy Father which seeth in secret shall reward thee openly" (Matt. 6:6).

They found in the textbook of Christian Science by Mary Baker Eddy, "Science and Health with Key to the Scriptures," a passage that explains the importance of private, silent prayer: "The closet typifies the sanctuary of Spirit, the door of which shuts out sinful sense but lets in Truth, Life, and Love. Closed to error, it is open to Truth, and vice versa" (page 15).

I've been helped time and again over the years by praying in that way, and I trusted that praying would help our family's situation this time, too.

I was perplexed, though, a few days after my husband was laid off to discover that, instead of preparing to retire, he was updating his resume, attending seminars for displaced executives, and networking.

I was momentarily tempted to campaign for moving; but my prayer had steadied me and confirmed my trust in God. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Doors Closing, Hearts Opening ; Bringing a Spiritual Perspective to Daily Life
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.