Intelligence Reform Already in Gear ; Whether or Not the Reform Bill Becomes Law, the CIA Is Facing a Transformation Unparalleled in Three Decades

By Peter Grier and Faye Bowers writers of The Christian Science Monitor | The Christian Science Monitor, December 1, 2004 | Go to article overview

Intelligence Reform Already in Gear ; Whether or Not the Reform Bill Becomes Law, the CIA Is Facing a Transformation Unparalleled in Three Decades


Peter Grier and Faye Bowers writers of The Christian Science Monitor, The Christian Science Monitor


In the months ahead, the Central Intelligence Agency will almost certainly undergo its most extensive shake-up in nearly 30 years.

Whether the intelligence reform bill now stuck in Congress becomes law might almost be beside the point. A new director, personality conflicts, and orders from the White House have already combined to produce turmoil at Langley unmatched since the Carter era, when Stansfield Turner cut spies overseas in favor of advanced electronic snooping.

Considering the dangers the US faces, now might seem a bad time for CIA reinvention. Better to have top officials focusing on the internal politics of Al Qaeda than those of their own bureaucracy, after all.

But new Director Porter Goss and his aides believe the opposite - that the era requires nothing less than big change - and they may have found willing ears in a Bush administration that appears to have long chafed at some aspects of the way the CIA does business. "They really do believe they have to start over again," says Robert Baer, a former CIA Middle East operative.

Intelligence restructuring legislation would still have a profound effect on the CIA, the Pentagon, and other US spy agencies, of course. Among other things, it would establish a new National Intelligence Director with budget power over all aspects of intelligence, including those overseen by the Department of Defense. It would also establish a joint counterterrorism center whose head would be a presidential appointee, subject to Senate confirmation.

Overall, "it puts into law not only the recommendations from [the 9/11] commission but other sources as well, and it creates a counterterror framework," said Lee Hamilton, former vice chairman of the National Commission on Terrorist Attacks Upon the United States, at a Monitor breakfast on Tuesday.

But at the time of writing, the bill remained stuck in the House due to the concerns of several powerful Representatives about its possible effect on the military chain of command, and its lack of certain immigration controls.

Some lawmakers have questioned whether President Bush really supports the bill. Republican committee chairmen are the ones halting action, after all. And top military officials have openly expressed their hope that nothing be done to effect their control over tactical aspects of intelligence.

Still, White House aides said they would push the bill this week. Among other things, Mr. Bush will send a letter to congressional leaders making his views on the legislation clear.

In the meantime, the administration has plunged ahead with intelligence reform of its own. In recent days, Bush has signed a series of executive orders that taken together might change the CIA's character, if not its size. …

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